Hugh Cameron MACMILLAN

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Badge Number: S34055
S34055

MACMILLAN, Hugh Cameron

Service Number: 466
Enlisted: 4 January 1915
Last Rank: Sergeant
Last Unit: 11th Light Horse Regiment
Born: Adelaide, South Australia, 1892
Home Town: Largs Bay, Port Adelaide Enfield, South Australia
Schooling: Not yet discovered
Occupation: Clerk
Died: Hypostatic pneumonia, Torrens Park Military Hospital, Mitcham, Adelaide, South Australia, 31 May 1919
Cemetery: Payneham Cemetery, S.A.
Western Extension Path 2 - Grave 202C
Memorials: Adelaide Scots Church WW1 Honour Board, Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour
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World War 1 Service

4 Jan 1915: Enlisted AIF WW1, Private
2 Jun 1915: Involvement Corporal, SN 466, 11th Light Horse Regiment
2 Jun 1915: Embarked Corporal, SN 466, 11th Light Horse Regiment, HMAT Medic, Brisbane
11 Nov 1918: Involvement Sergeant, SN 466, 11th Light Horse Regiment
Date unknown: Wounded SN 466, 11th Light Horse Regiment

Help us honour Hugh Cameron MacMillan's service by contributing information, stories, and images so that they can be preserved for future generations.

Biography contributed by Steve Larkins

He is a recent addition to the roll of Great War dead; he was accepted, after research, for commemoration on 24/08/2012. He was 27.

Biography contributed by David Barlow

Sergeant MacMillan of the 11th Australian Light Horse Regiment was wounded in action in Palestine 13 November 1917

He was treated by the 4th Light Horse Field Ambulance for a gun-shot wound to the neck and transferred to the 74th Casualty Clearing Station, then to the 44th Stationary Hospital in Kantara, on to the 14th Australian General Hospital at Abbassia and then placed on a ship for Australia

He was listed as 'dangerously ill' 18 November 1917 with a Medical report dated 31 December 1917 stating 'Complete paralysis from waist downwards came on immediately [after wounding]'

He died at the 15th Australian General Hospital (Torrens Park Military Hospital) in Mitcham (Adelaide, South Australia) due to hypostatic pneumonia which was directly attributed to his war service.

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