Charles Morison SMITH MM

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SMITH, Charles Morison

Service Number: 1552
Enlisted: 26 March 1915
Last Rank: Second Lieutenant
Last Unit: 23rd Infantry Battalion
Born: South Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 1892
Home Town: Footscray, Maribyrnong, Victoria
Schooling: Footscray State School, Victoria, Australia
Occupation: Salesman
Died: Died of wounds, Bullecourt, France, 7 May 1917
Cemetery: Grevillers British Cemetery
IV C 5
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World War 1 Service

26 Mar 1915: Enlisted AIF WW1, Private, SN 1552, 23rd Infantry Battalion
8 May 1915: Involvement Private, SN 1552, 23rd Infantry Battalion
8 May 1915: Embarked Private, SN 1552, 23rd Infantry Battalion, HMAT Euripides, Melbourne
5 Oct 1915: Promoted AIF WW1, Lance Corporal, 23rd Infantry Battalion
2 Jan 1916: Promoted AIF WW1, Corporal, 23rd Infantry Battalion
29 Jul 1916: Promoted AIF WW1, Sergeant, 23rd Infantry Battalion
2 Sep 1916: Honoured Military Medal
26 Apr 1917: Promoted AIF WW1, Second Lieutenant, 23rd Infantry Battalion

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Biography contributed by Faithe Jones

Son of David M and Mary Colston SMITH

Military Medal

'For gallant conduct in leading his men during the attack on 29th July, 1916, at POZIERES, and for his skill and coolness in setting to work on consolidating our position.'
Source: 'Commonwealth Gazette' No. 184
Date: 14 December 1916

SERGT. C. SMITH, Military Medal.
The friends of Sergeant Charles Smith, of Gledhill street, will be pleased to know that his wound is not serious, and that he is again with his battalion in France. He was in the same engagement as Sergeant Crow. of Yarraville, and has received the Military Medal for
bravery on the field, Sergeant Smith was a resident of Footscray for 21 years and well known. He was one of the last to leave Gallipoli in December last, being there for nearly 5 months. No particulars are yet to hand of the exploit which earned for Sergt. Smith his medal. He was buried by shell explosions twice in the Pozieres fight and
had a few days in a rest camp to recover the shock.

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