William Pigott DARBY

DARBY, William Pigott

Service Number: 6
Enlisted: 25 September 1914
Last Rank: Corporal
Last Unit: 15th Infantry Battalion
Born: Monasterevin, Co Kildare, Ireland, 25 April 1872
Home Town: Sydney, City of Sydney, New South Wales
Schooling: Not yet discovered
Occupation: Traveller
Died: Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 15 November 1935, aged 63 years, cause of death not yet discovered
Cemetery: Toowong (Brisbane General) Cemetery
Toowong Cemetery, QLD PLOT: No.23, Section 70, Portion 10 (Currently unmarked)
Memorials:
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World War 1 Service

25 Sep 1914: Enlisted AIF WW1, Private, SN 6, 15th Infantry Battalion
22 Dec 1914: Embarked Private, SN 6, 17th Infantry Battalion, HMAT Ceramic, Melbourne
22 Dec 1914: Involvement Private, SN 6, 17th Infantry Battalion
14 Mar 1916: Promoted AIF WW1, Corporal, 15th Infantry Battalion
13 Aug 1916: Wounded AIF WW1, Corporal, SN 6, 4th Field Ambulance, Pozières, Shell shock
1 Jun 1917: Transferred AIF WW1, Corporal, 4th Field Ambulance
2 Jul 1918: Discharged AIF WW1, Corporal, SN 6, 15th Infantry Battalion

Help us honour William Pigott Darby's service by contributing information, stories, and images so that they can be preserved for future generations.

Biography contributed by Evan Evans

From Chris Pigott, courtesy of Find A Grave

Cpl William Pigott Darby.

Eldest child of Dr. Martin P. Darby [1834-1901] and Anne Mary Pigott Darby [1841-1902] of Monasterevin, Co. Kildare, Ireland.

A former medical student, at The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin.

Married Elizabeth Josephine Conroy, at Fairview, Dublin, Ireland, in 1903.

They went to London, where their two children were born. They migrated to New Zealand in 1909, and appear to have separated in 1912-13.

William went to Australia, and after a period in Sydney, he went to Brisbane. In September 1914, he enlisted in the army at Toowoomba, Queensland. He served in WW1 as an Australian, in the Ambulance unit of the 15th Battalion of A.I.F, and was present at Gallipoli in April 1915 and at The Somme in August 1916, where he was blown up in a shell explosion.

Rescued, he was profoundly deaf afterwards, and suffered from "shellshock" and what is now termed "post traumatic stress disorder".

He was the model for the figure of the soldier which stands guard at one end of The Cenotaph, Martin Place, Sydney.

In 2006, a grandniece of William commissioned the Irish sculptor John Coll to create a replica statue of the one in Sydney. The statue was unveiled in the garden of a private house in Ireland, in April 2007, in the presence of very many of his grand-nieces and grand-nephews, and their children. The Australian Government was represented by a Lieut-Colonel at the ceremony.

In 2006, a grandniece of William commissioned the Irish sculptor John Coll to create a replica statue of the one in Sydney. The statue was unveiled in the garden of a private house in Ireland, in April 2007, in the presence of very many of his grand-nieces and grand-nephews, and their children. The Australian Government was represented by a Lieut-Colonel at the ceremony.

William was a granduncle of the creator of the memorial. His sister Lia Darby O'Grady being one of my grandmothers

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