John Stanley MCBAIN MM

Badge Number: 14932, Sub Branch: Prospect
14932

MCBAIN, John Stanley

Service Number: 14814
Enlisted: 19 January 1916, Adelaide, South Australia
Last Rank: Sapper
Last Unit: 5th Divisional Signal Company
Born: Bishopbourne, Tasmania, 19 September 1889
Home Town: Bishopsbourne, Northern Midlands, Tasmania
Schooling: Not yet discovered
Occupation: Plumber
Died: Natural causes (sudden), Adelaide, South Australia, 21 March 1939, aged 49 years
Cemetery: AIF Cemetery, West Terrace Cemetery, Adelaide
Section: LO, Road: 1AN, Site No: 15
Memorials: Hawthorn Victory Lodge Roll of Honour
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World War 1 Service

19 Jan 1916: Enlisted AIF WW1, Private, SN 14814, Adelaide, South Australia
14 Aug 1916: Involvement AIF WW1, Sapper, SN 14814, 5th Divisional Signal Company, Enlistment/Embarkation WW1
14 Aug 1916: Embarked AIF WW1, Sapper, SN 14814, 5th Divisional Signal Company, HMAT Itria, Adelaide
25 Apr 1918: Honoured Military Medal, Villers-Bretonneux
18 Sep 1919: Discharged AIF WW1, Sapper, SN 14814, 5th Divisional Signal Company

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Biography

Awarded the Military Medal

"For courage and devotion to duty. This man displayed great courage and devotion to duty on the morning of 25th April, 1918, near BRETONEUX. He was detailed to lay a line to the 49th Battalion at CACHY. Despite a heavy barrage from the enemy and the fact that the AQUENNE Wood, through which he had to pass, was at the time full of gas, he persistently carried on with his work and established the required communication. During the operations, the cable, which was an important one, was continually cut by shell fire. On each occasion he patrolled the line and kept it working with but short interruptions. It was entirely due to his courage and untiring energy that this was accomplished." - Source: Commonwealth Gazette No. 1 Date: 2 January 1919

"Man Dies Outside Place Of Employment

John Stanley McBain, 49, of Wellington square, North Adelaide, collapsed and died in a lane at the rear of the premises of the South Australian Gas Co., Waymouth street. City, about 7.15 a.m. today. Mr. McBain was an employee of the company and was about to enter the building to begin work when he collapsed. Plainclothes Constable Dinan is preparing a report for the City Coroner (Mr. Blackburn)." - from the Adelaide News 21 Mar 1939 (nla.gov.au)

 
 

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Biography contributed by Steve Larkins

From How We Served

14814 Sapper John Stanley McBain MM of Northern Midlands, Tasmania had been employed as a plumber when he enlisted for War Service on the 19th of January 1916. Allocated to reinforcements for the 5th Divisional Signal Company 1st AIF and embarked for England and further training on the 14th of August 1916.

John contracted mumps whilst in his training phase before being sent the trenches, and following his recovery he arrived in France on the 11th of September with is joining his Unit in the field on the 15th. From the time he was taken on strength his service would be continuous aside short periods of leave.
For his devotion for duty whilst assisting the 49th Battalion on the 25th of April of 1918 John was recommended for, and would receive the Military Bravery for ‘bravery in the field’.

His citation reads as follow;- ‘For courage and devotion to duty. This man displayed great courage and devotion to duty on the morning of 25th April, 1918, near BRETONEUX. He was detailed to lay a line to the 49th Battalion at CACHY. Despite a heavy barrage from the enemy and the fact that the AQUENNE Wood, through which he had to pass, was at the time full of gas, he persistently carried on with his work and established the required communication. During the operations, the cable, which was an important one, was continually cut by shell fire. On each occasion he patrolled the line and kept it working with but short interruptions. It was entirely due to his courage and untiring energy that this was accomplished." - Source: Commonwealth Gazette No. 1 Date: 2 January 1919

On the 31st of October John was evacuated due to influenza but by a fortnight later he was deemed well enough to return to his Unit, and remained in France until being sent to England on the 9th of April 1919. John was embarked for his repatriation back to Australia on the 22nd of May.

Following his return to Adelaide John was admitted into the 7th Australian General Hospital (Keswick) for what was diagnosed to be tinnitus caused by time whilst serving the vicinity of Ypres. John received his discharge from the 1st AIF on the 18th of September 1919 and was re-entered into civilian life. John’s untimely and sudden death occurred on the 21st March 1939, at the age of 49, and following his death he was formally laid to rest within West Terrace Cemetery, South Australia.

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