Errol Sydney WATKINS

Poppy

WATKINS, Errol Sydney

Service Number: 1318
Enlisted: 16 February 1915, Liverpool, New South Wales
Last Rank: Private
Last Unit: 17th Infantry Battalion
Born: Redfern, New South Wales, Australia, 20 November 1895
Home Town: Waverley, Waverley, New South Wales
Schooling: Fort Street High School, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Occupation: Joiner's machinist
Died: Killed in Action, France, 15 April 1917, aged 21 years
Cemetery: Vis-En-Artois British Cemetery, Haucourt
Memorials: Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour
Show Relationships

World War 1 Service

16 Feb 1915: Enlisted AIF WW1, Private, SN 1318, Liverpool, New South Wales
12 May 1915: Involvement Private, SN 1318, 17th Infantry Battalion
12 May 1915: Embarked Private, SN 1318, 17th Infantry Battalion, HMAT Themistocles, Sydney
15 Apr 1917: Involvement AIF WW1, Private, SN 1318, 17th Infantry Battalion

Private Errol Watkins

From Peter Barnes

I recently uploaded the video ‘You Never Came Home’ to this Facebook page, which included photographs of Australians who never came home from the Western Front in WW1.

One incredible photograph in the video is of stretcher bearers and dressers totally exhausted on the battlefield after working 60 hours without rest to retrieve the wounded. One of the most profound images of WW1.

The soldier in this post was a stretcher bearer and he is included in the video, and is one of the soldiers who never came home. What happened to this very brave soldier is tragic. Eager to save his wounded comrades on the battlefield,
he was conned by the enemy.

Private Errol Watkins of Waverley, NSW, enlisted in the AIF in February 1915.

Private Watkins was an original member of the 17th Battalion who served on Gallipoli and the Western Front as a stretcher bearer.

According to his Red Cross Wounded and Missing Bureau file, Private Watkins went out on a patrol after the counter-attack at Lagnicourt on the 15th of April 1917, to collect the wounded from the German positions.

Private Watkins responded to repeated calls for stretcher bearers believing they were wounded Australians, but was last seen surrounded by a group of Germans who had been calling out in English.

Repeated attempts were made by the Red Cross to determine whether he was a prisoner of war in Germany, but discovered after the war that Private Watkins had been shot in the stomach and died of wounds at Rumancourt on the 15th of April, age 21.

Lest We Forget.

Read more...

Errol Sydney Watkins

He was one of my Father Jack Watkins's uncles . He died in action on 15th April 1917 . His brother was Jack Cosgrove ( Bluey ) Watkins , who was a gunner in World War 1 no 32922 . Bluey was Kangaroo no 92 and played as lock forward in the 1921/22 tour of Great Britain . He also played during the War for the Australian Imperial Forces against the UK in a series of rugby league matches . He returned to Australia and eventually became Captain of Eastern Suburbs , his only local team . He died on 15.7.74 and the Governor General , John Kerr attended his funeral .
His other brother was Charles , my grandfather and my living father Jack's Dad .

Read more...
Showing 2 of 2 stories

Biography contributed by Evan Evans

In Memory Of


In Memory Of Private Errol Watkins of Waverley, NSW, who enlisted in the AIF in February 1915.

What happened to this very brave soldier is tragic. Eager to save his wounded comrades on the battlefield, he was conned by the enemy.

Private Watkins was an original member of the 17th Battalion who served on Gallipoli and the Western Front as a stretcher bearer.

According to his Red Cross Wounded and Missing Bureau file, Private Watkins went out on a patrol after the counter-attack at Lagnicourt on the 15th of April 1917, to collect the wounded from the German positions.

Private Watkins responded to repeated calls for stretcher bearers believing they were wounded Australians, but was last seen surrounded by a group of Germans who had been calling out in English.

Repeated attempts were made by the Red Cross to determine whether he was a prisoner of war in Germany, but discovered after the war that Private Watkins had been shot in the stomach and died of wounds at Rumancourt on the 15th of April, age 21.

Lest We Forget.

Read more...