William Harvey BLAKE MC

BLAKE, William Harvey

Service Number: 812
Enlisted: 21 August 1914, at Morphettville
Last Rank: Second Lieutenant
Last Unit: 10th Infantry Battalion
Born: Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1891
Home Town: Brompton, South Australia
Schooling: Not yet discovered
Occupation: Carpenter
Died: Waikerie, South Australia, Australia, 19 February 1970, cause of death not yet discovered
Cemetery: Waikerie General Cemetery, South Australia
Tree Plaque: Not yet discovered
Memorials:
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World War 1 Service

21 Aug 1914: Enlisted AIF WW1, Sergeant, SN 812, 1st Divisional Train, at Morphettville
20 Oct 1914: Involvement AIF WW1, Sergeant, SN 812, 1st Divisional Train
20 Oct 1914: Embarked AIF WW1, Sergeant, SN 812, 1st Divisional Train, HMAT Medic, Adelaide
2 Dec 1915: Involvement AIF WW1, Sergeant, SN 812, 1st Divisional Train, 'ANZAC' / Gallipoli
11 Nov 1917: Transferred AIF WW1, Second Lieutenant, 10th Infantry Battalion
30 May 1918: Wounded AIF WW1, Second Lieutenant, 10th Infantry Battalion, German Spring Offensive 1918, GSW both hands
16 Sep 1918: Honoured Military Cross, German Spring Offensive 1918, In the operations against enemy posts at MONT DE MERRIS near STRAZEELE on night 29th/30th May, 1918, Lieutenant BLAKE was in charge of an attacking platoon of his battalion. Though wounded in the both hands early in the operation he continued to lead his platoon and rushed the objective, capturing and consolidating it under heavy machine gun fire. Later, with three of his men, he rushed an enemy machine gun post, killing the garrison and bringing in the lock of the gun. Thought badly wounded in both hands by shrapnel he remained on duty until his post had been dug in and consolidated.

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Biography

Military Cross

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion in charge of a platoon of his battalion in an attack on enemy posts. Although wounded in an earlier skirmish he continued to lead his platoon, rushed the objective, capturing and consolidating it under heavy machine gun fire. Later, with 3 men, he rushed and enemy machinegun post, killing the garrison and bringing back portions of the gun. Although badly wounded he remained on duty until his post had been consolidated’.


He was admitted to hospital in Wimereux, France on 20 September 1918 with severe gunshot wounds to his right leg and sent to England. He was returned to Australia on board Lancaster on 7 February 1919

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