Agnes Maud (Maude) GLENIE

GLENIE, Agnes Maud (Maude)

Service Number: Nurse
Enlisted: Not yet discovered
Last Rank: Sister
Last Unit: SA Nursing Sisters
Born: Chowilla, South Australia, 20 April 1868
Home Town: Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia
Schooling: Not yet discovered
Occupation: Nurse
Died: Stroke, North Adelaide, 13 February 1915, aged 46 years
Cemetery: West Terrace Cemetery (General)
Catholic Western Ground Row J site 154
Memorials:
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Boer War Service

1 Feb 1900: Involvement Australian and Colonial Military Forces (Boer War / Boxer Rebellion), Sister, SN Nurse, SA Nursing Sisters

Training

Miss A. M. Glenie was trained in the North Adelaide Private Hospital and also at Miss Tibbits's Hospital, and she has had 10 years' experience

The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide) Saturday 10 February 1900 page 4

Our War Nurses

OUR WAR NURSES.
Sister Glennie having gone to England on transport duty, writing to Lady Brown from London, says:-"I have been here just over a week. We had a pretty good Trip from the Cape. I shall be here a month. I am, I think, going to Sheffield for a week. Lady Dudley is so very kind to us all, and rends us anywhere we want to go. She intended me to go to the High- lands and to Edinburgh, but I cannot find a sister who would like the trip," so that must pass. I feel disappointed about it, as it is a chance in one's life-journey and all expenses paid from a fund. I am staying in one of Lady Dudley's Homes for Sisters, and very comfortable it is. We can do exactly as we like, which is very nice after hospitals. Lady Dudley is a most charming woman. I saw the director general yesterday; he is very nice also."
Miss Glennie goes on to say that she has been seeing some of the interesting sights of London, and she speaks of the pleasure it has been to meet South Australians, and desires to be remembered to he committee.

The Advertiser Adelaide Wednesday 30 October 1901 page 4

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Biography

"Before her marriage she was well known as Nurse Maude Glenie, and received her training at the North Adelaide Hospital. She volunteered for the front when the South African War broke out, and left Adelaide with several other nurses in February, 1900. She was at the Bose Hospital at Wynberg for a time, and then went on to Bloomfontein after its capture by Lord Roberts. Subsequently Nurse Glenie went to Pretoria and Johannesberg. In August, 1901, she was ordered. on transport duty to England in charge of sick and wounded soldiers. After a few weeks in Lady Douglas' Home for Nursing Sisters, she returned, to South Africa on duty in the hospital ship Nubia, and went to the front once more. She was in the Heidelberg Hospital till March, 1902, when, the war being over, she returned to Australia on July 12, 1902, with Nurse M. S. Bidmead. Nurse Glenie was presented with a gold medal by Lady Tennyson "for devoted service" on behalf of the South Australian Nurses Fund Committee."

Southern Cross, Friday 19 February 1915.

Maude married Hugh Bonython, son of Sir John Langdon Bonython who was a parliamentarian and, from 1894, sole proprieter of The Advertiser. Hugh, who was very ill when Maude died suddenly of a stroke at the age of 46, was said to have never recovered from the shock of her death, passing away three weeks later. 

OBITUARY.
MRS. H. T. BONYTHON.
The sudden death of Mrs. Hugh T. Bonython, of Childers 'Street, North Adelaide, on Saturday evening last, will cause deep sorrow to a large circle of friends. The deceased lady received a stroke on Saturday afternoon and passed away about 7 p.m., after receiving the last rites of the Church from Fr. Hogan, O.P. Mrs. Bonython was a daughter of the late Mt. Henry Sneyd Glenie, stock inspector of Chowilla, River Murray. Before her marriage she was well known as Nurse Maude Glenie, and received her training at the North Adelaide Hospital. She volunteered for the front when the South African War broke out, and left Adelaide with several other nurses in February, 1900. She was at the Bose Hospital at Wynberg for a time, and then went on to Bloomfontein after its capture by Lord Roberts. Subsequently Nurse Glenie went to Pretoria and Johannesberg. In August, 1901, she was ordered on transport duty to England in charge of sick and wounded soldiers. After a few weeks in Lady Douglas' Home for Nursing Sisters, she returned, to South Africa on duty in he hospital ship Nubia, and went to the front once more. She was in the Heidelberg Hospital till March, 1902, when, the war being over, she returned o Australia on July 12, 1902, with Nurse M. S. Zidmead. Nurse Glenie was presented with a gold medal by Lady Tennyson "for devoted service" on behalf of the South Australian Nurses Fund Committee. An interesting interview with Nurse Glenie appeared in the "Southern Cross" after her return. Mrs. Bonython was buried in the Catholic Cemetery, West Terrace, on Sunday afternoon last.

Southern Cross Friday 19 February 1915 page 9

She was a daughter of the late Mr. Henry Sneyd Glenie, of Chowilla, on the River Murray, who was formerly inspector of stock in the South-East.
She was a granddaughter of an Anglican archdeacon and a niece of a catholic canon. Miss Glenie was a highly trained nurse, and when the South African war broke out she offered her services to the military authorities, who gladly accepted them. She went to the front, where she remained throughout the war, except for a visit to England in charge of soldiers invalided home. She did splendid work among the sick and wounded, and was rewarded not only by the gratitude of her many patients, but by the award of a military decoration '"for devoted service." Mrs. Bonython was held in the highest esteem by a wide circle of friends, and her untimely death occasioned expressions of intense regret.

Critic (Adelaide) Wednesday 17 March 1915 page 6

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