John Henry GILMORE

GILMORE, John Henry

Service Number: 88834
Enlisted: 8 December 1943
Last Rank: Leading Aircraftman
Last Unit: Royal Australian Air Force
Born: Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 3 November 1925
Home Town: Launceston, Launceston, Tasmania
Schooling: Not yet discovered
Occupation: Garage Assistant
Died: 1999, cause of death not yet discovered, place of death not yet discovered
Cemetery: Carr Villa Memorial Park, Tasmania
Cremated at the Carr Villa Memorial Park, Tasmania and his ashes were collected.
Memorials:
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World War 2 Service

8 Dec 1943: Enlisted Royal Australian Air Force, Aircraftman, SN 88834
5 Feb 1946: Discharged Royal Australian Air Force, Leading Aircraftman, Royal Australian Air Force

Help us honour John Henry Gilmore's service by contributing information, stories, and images so that they can be preserved for future generations.

Biography contributed by Robert Kearney

Today we honour a Tasmanian Cycling Legend in Jack Gilmore. Mr Gilmore, as most of us called him, was a cyclist who had his career cut into by World War 2. On his return he raced again but was to become known as our most respected Coach of his time. Born John Henry Gilmore in Hobart in 1925 , Jack was a huge influence on Tasmanian Cycling till he passed in 1999.

His family moved to Campbell Town then Invermay Road, Elizabeth Street and finally South Launceston, where his bride Eileen still lives. He was one of six children with his brothers Roy and Adrian also cyclists. Jacks Father Albert raced in the 1920's, and his Grandfather James in the early 1900's. Jack was an all rounder finishing 3rd in the State Junior Road Time Trial from Granton to New Norfolk and return in 1941. Most of his early Track Racing was on York Park with good results.

Then World War 2 Came along. Jack changed his age so he could join just like his Dad did years before. Jack served in New Guinea and Borneo and his Dad at Laverton Airstrip. Jack only raced sparingly when he returned from active service.

Jacks biggest contribution to cycling was his coaching. He was well before his time, with many of his principles still used today. Structured Training for his riders, Firstly strong basic skills, endurance, strength training, speed and the icing on the cake of race tactics. Jacks riders won 21 National Titles and 35 State Titles and began Tasmania's Golden Run that lasted for years.

He organised long Sunday Endurance Training rides, for his own riders and anyone else who wanted to go. Sometimes these groups were bigger than the local race fields, but you had to put in. His rides included Fingal and return and took them to Lagoon beach to wade thigh high in the salt water for recovery and strength training. He introduced the famous Scottsdale Loop and riders had to ride back from Nunamara on fixed wheels with 68 gearing. This improved pedalling technique. 

Jack had a favourite Launceston circuit that riders did not like. They would leave the Gilmore's in Bennett St and turn down punchbowl road. Right into Amy Rd and right into Penquite Rd. Up Queechy hill right at Norwood Ave to Punchbowl Reserve. Up out of the Reserve up Punchbowl Rd to Normanstone Rd. Down Westbury Rd. up Frankland St, down Fredrick up Balfour down Wentworth up David St along Talbot Rd to Six Ways and repeat. The Strength Training Ride. They say Jack wore out 3 cars following his boys , especially at night training.

He was highly respected and very calm. if, however, you did the wrong thing at training or in a race he didn't have to jump up and down or yell. He would fix you with his steely blue eyed stare and you knew. Oh boy did you know. Jack Gilmore. Master Coach and maker of Champions. Thanks to Jacks son Graeme for the wonderful history. Thanks Dale Atkinson. Photos. 2. A very young Jack at York Park 1941 at 16 years of age. 2. 6th in Half Mile York Park 1942. 3. World War 2. 4. Carrick Road Race 1946 being held by his Brother in Law Pat McGaughey. - From Allan Knight

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