Richard Horace Maconochie GIBBS MC

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GIBBS, Richard Horace Maconochie

Service Number: Officer
Enlisted: 10 May 1915, Melbourne, Victoria
Last Rank: Lieutenant
Last Unit: 59th Infantry Battalion
Born: Warracknabeal, Victoria, Australia, 4 February 1892
Home Town: Colac, Colac-Otway, Victoria
Schooling: Caulfield Grammar School & Melbourne University, Victoria, Australia
Occupation: Medical Student
Died: Killed in action, Fromelles, France, 19 July 1916, aged 24 years
Cemetery: No known grave - "Known Unto God"
V.C. Corner (Panel No 14), Australian Cemetery Memorial, Fromelles, France
Memorials: Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour, Colac Soldier's Memorial, Colac St Andrew's Presbyterian Church Honor Roll, Colac St Andrew's Presbyterian Church Honor Roll, V.C. Corner Australian Cemetery Memorial
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World War 1 Service

10 May 1915: Enlisted AIF WW1, Second Lieutenant, SN Officer, 6th Infantry Battalion, Melbourne, Victoria
28 Jan 1916: Involvement AIF WW1, Second Lieutenant, SN Officer, 6th Infantry Battalion
28 Jan 1916: Embarked AIF WW1, Second Lieutenant, SN Officer, 6th Infantry Battalion, HMAT Themistocles, Melbourne
21 Mar 1916: Transferred AIF WW1, Second Lieutenant, 59th Infantry Battalion, Egypt
1 Jun 1916: Promoted AIF WW1, Lieutenant, 59th Infantry Battalion, Egypt
19 Jul 1916: Involvement AIF WW1, Lieutenant, 59th Infantry Battalion
19 Jul 1916: Involvement AIF WW1, Lieutenant, 59th Infantry Battalion, Fromelles (Fleurbaix)
29 Aug 1916: Honoured Military Cross, Fromelles (Fleurbaix), For conspicuous gallantry in action.
Date unknown: Involvement 59th Infantry Battalion, Fromelles (Fleurbaix)

Story about his father Doctor Richard Horace GIBBS

Doctor Richard Horace GIBBS - of Colac - shown at the wheel of his 1910

Model - T Ford.

Warwick Landy wrote of the trip he and his father Bill made for the “Return to Colac” -in 2010, one hundred years after the car was sold from the premises as shown in our other pages.No doubt Bill and Warwick learned more of the
good doctor himself during their many daysyears ??] seeking information; however, that does not mean nothing else was found, indeed it is probably because neither are as loquacious as your editor.

What more do we know of Dr. R. H. GIBBS ?

He was born in Melbourne in 1863, married Helen MACONOCHIE in 1892; his son -Richard Horace “Dick” Maconochie GIBBS is recorded as having been born in Warracknabeal on Birth Death & Marriage Records - yet other areas shown “Colac” as his birthplace ! A daughter - Jean Gilroy GIBBS, was born in Colac in 1905, thus giving us a time frame for Dr. Richard GIBBS being in Colac. Time went by, Dr. R.H.G., purchased a De Dion Bouton motor car; then in 1910 as per Warwick’s story, he bought the Model T Ford.

World War One began; Richard - a Third Year University of Melbourne Medical Student enlisted on 10th May 1915. Like thousands of others, Richard embarked for overseas duty on 28th January 1916, he was“Killed In Action” on 19th July 1916 at Fromelles, France. Recorded on official records as “Having No Known Grave” - though it only adds to the pathos despite the fact he was posthumously awarded a Military Cross. Worse was to come !!!!

Dr. Richard GIBBS is thought to have enlisted into the Medical Corps as he was on the way to a Military Hospital in Melbourne on 13th July 1919 when he attempted to alight from a tram, he slipped and died of injuries as a result. A sad ending to the story of Bill’s Model T - Ford from Colac.

See photo of his father Richard in 1910 in his Model T Ford on this profile
Source:
http://www.federation.asn.au/Newsletters/FedNews70.pdf

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Biography

Richard Horace Maconochie GIBBS was born on 4th Feb. 1892 in Warracknabeal, Victoria

His parents were (Doctor) Richard Horace GIBBS and Helen MACONOCHIE

Richard had  previously served with the Volunteer Cadets and was in his 3rd year at Melbourne University studying to be a Doctor when he enlisted on 10th May, 1915 with the Australian Army - 6th Battalion, 14th re-inforcements - Unit left Melbourne on board HMAT Themistocles on 28th January, 1916 - rank 2nd Lieutenant 

He was Killed in Action on 19th July, 1916 - no known grave - his name is on the V.C. Corner Australian Cemetery Memorial , Fromelles, France and also on the Australian War Memorial - rank Lieutenant

His brother John Harbinger GIBBS (5th Battalion) also served in WW1 and returned to Australia in 1917 due to illness and died in October 1917 - buried Colac Cemetery along with his father Richard who died in a tram accident in 1919 

Richard was posthumously awarded the Military Cross in  1916 - "For conspicous gallantry in action when his company commander was seriously wounded he took charge and led his men over the parapet and steadily forward under very heavy machine gun and rifle fire."

 

 

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Biography contributed by Robert Wight

Military Cross

'For conspicuous gallantry in action. When his company commander was seriously wounded he took charge and led his men over the parapet and steadily forward under very heavy machine gun and rifle fire.'
Source: 'Commonwealth Gazette' No. 184
Date: 14 December 1916

Prior to enlisting, Lt Gibbs played 35 games (1912-14) for University Football Club in the VFL.

Biography contributed by Evan Evans

From In Memory Of

In Memory Of Lieutenant Richard Gibbs MC, 6th Battalion, of Colac, Victoria.

A university medical student prior to enlistment, 2nd Lieutenant Gibbs embarked with the 14th Reinforcements from Melbourne on HMAT Themistocles on the 28th of January 1916.
He was later transferred to the 59th Battalion and promoted to the rank of Lieutenant. He was killed in action on the 19th of July 1916, at Fleubaix, France, aged 23.

He has no known grave and is commemorated at VC Corner Australian Cemetery Memorial, Fromelles, France.

Lieutenant Gibbs was posthumously awarded a Military Cross for his actions in battle shortly before his death.

Lieutenant Gibbs brother, Corporal John Gibbs, Administration Headquarters, died of illness at his home in Colac, Victoria, on the 13th of October 1917, after being repatriated to Australia from England.
After the deaths of Richard and John Gibbs, their father Richard Horace Gibbs, gave up his medical practice in Colac, and devoted his work to the medical care of sick and wounded soldiers who had returned to Australia.

Richard Horace Gibbs was gazetted a Major in the AIF and appointed Senior Surgeon at No 16 Australian General Hospital. Major Gibbs was killed in a tram accident in Melbourne in July 1919.
Lest We Forget.

Information comes from the Australian War Memorial. Image file number AWM P07241.004.

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