Thomas EDMONDS

Poppy

EDMONDS, Thomas

Service Number: 1107
Enlisted: 1 September 1914, Sydney, NSW
Last Rank: Private
Last Unit: 4th Infantry Battalion
Born: Sydney, New South Wales, 1876
Home Town: Auburn, Auburn, New South Wales
Schooling: Not yet discovered
Occupation: Labourer
Died: Killed in action, Gallipoli, 20 August 1915
Cemetery: Lone Pine Cemetery, ANZAC
Plot 11, Row C, Grave 12
Memorials: Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour
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World War 1 Service

1 Sep 1914: Enlisted AIF WW1, Private, SN 1107, 4th Infantry Battalion, Sydney, NSW
20 Oct 1914: Involvement Private, SN 1107, 4th Infantry Battalion, 'ANZAC' / Gallipoli
20 Oct 1914: Embarked Private, SN 1107, 4th Infantry Battalion, HMAT Euripides, Sydney
20 Aug 1915: Involvement AIF WW1, Private, 4th Infantry Battalion, 'ANZAC' / Gallipoli

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Biography contributed by Carol Foster

Next of kin given as his sister Lucy Mary Robinson of 2 Marion Street,  Auburn, NSW. Also brother of Edward Charles Edmonds, James Edmonds, Jack Norton Edmonds, Ellen (nee Edmonds) White, Fred Edmonds and Lily (nee Edmonds) Kelly.

Medals: 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal

Also served in the India Infantry for about 7 years

Biography contributed by Faithe Jones

AUBURN'S FIRST VOLUNTEER
KILLED.
Official intimation has been received by Mrs. James Robinson, of Marion-street, Auburn, of the death of her brother, Private Thomas Boyce Edmonds, who was killed in action on 20th August at the Dardanelles. He was the first Volunteer to enlist from Auburn for the front and left with the 4th Battalion for the war in October last. He took part in the fight at the landing on 25th April, which he got through safely, though he had some narrow squeaks. His last letter to his sister is dated 19th July, from the hospital at Cairo. He had  evidently been wounded, for he stated that he was nearly all right and was going back to the firing line. He said he was 67 days in the firing line without a change of scene during the first 35 days, in which he had only two washes and one change of socks. He only had his boots off once. Deceased was well-known in Auburn and popular amongst his mates. He was a man of great strength. He had seen service before in South Africa. A brother (Major Edmonds) is now at the front with the 13th Battalion, and another one, who resided at Smithfield, has enlisted and is just now in camp, whilst a third, who resides with his sister (Mrs. Robinson), is seriously thinking about offering his services.

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