Francis Gilbert EVANS

Poppy

EVANS, Francis Gilbert

Service Number: 63
Enlisted: 17 August 1914, Morphettville, South Australia
Last Rank: Private
Last Unit: 10th Infantry Battalion
Born: Adelaide, South Australia, 15 February 1894
Home Town: Adelaide, South Australia
Schooling: Gilles Street School, Adelaide
Occupation: Electrician
Died: Wounds received at Gallipoli, Malta, 31 May 1915, aged 21 years
Cemetery: Pieta Military Cemetery
Row A, Grave No. 1 Plot I, INSCRIPTION IN MEMORY OF THE LOVED SON OF MR.& MRS.J.EVANS OF ADELAIDE S.A.
Memorials: Adelaide Gilles Street Primary School WW1 Honour Board (Original), Adelaide National War Memorial, Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour, Prospect Malta G.C. and the ANZACs - "The Nurse of the Mediterranean"
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World War 1 Service

17 Aug 1914: Enlisted AIF WW1, Private, SN 63, Morphettville, South Australia
20 Oct 1914: Involvement AIF WW1, Private, SN 63, 10th Infantry Battalion, Enlistment/Embarkation WW1
20 Oct 1914: Embarked AIF WW1, Private, SN 63, 10th Infantry Battalion, HMAT Ascanius, Adelaide
25 Apr 1915: Involvement AIF WW1, Private, SN 63, 10th Infantry Battalion, 'ANZAC' / Gallipoli

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Biography

Original member of  B Company 10th Battalion

 

"During the afternoon the Prince of Wales, London, Queen, and Bachante, followed by six destroyers and the four 3rd Brigade transports, sailed out of Mudros Harbour and headed for Imbros Island. Shortly after mid-day the destroyers came alongside the Ionian and the battalion headquarters with B and C companies under the command of Major Oldham and Captain Jacob, transferred to the Prince of Wales. At 11 p.m., A and D companies under the command of Major Miles Beevor and Captain Herbert moved over to the destroyers Scourge and Foxhound."

 

"Lieutenant Hector Roy Hemming was a platoon commander in B Company at the landing and was noted for being the tallest officer in the “original” 10th Battalion. By late afternoon on  25 April “Long Tom” as he was affectionately called had another distinction, one he certainly would not have wished for. He was the only officer still operational within B Company, the O.C., 2.I.C., and one of the platoon commanders were killed, the remaining platoon commanders were both badly wounded and forced to evacuate. When the battalion was relieved Hemming and twenty of his men had been in a position so extremely difficult to get to that they could not be resupplied and as a consequence were desperately short of both food and water."

 

Extracts from the book about the 10 Battalion AIF -  Silent Voices

 

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Biography contributed by Geoffrey Gillon

He was 21 and the son of John and Jane Evans, of Rankine Rd., Torrensville, South Australia.