Frederick Lincoln (Fred) SCHRAMM MM

Badge Number: 29673, Sub Branch: Tumby Bay
29673

SCHRAMM, Frederick Lincoln

Service Number: 5751
Enlisted: 20 March 1916
Last Rank: Corporal
Last Unit: 48th Infantry Battalion
Born: Port Lincoln, Souith Australia, 14 March 1896
Home Town: Tumby Bay, Tumby Bay, South Australia
Schooling: Whites River, Souith Australia
Occupation: Farmer
Died: Port Lincoln, Souith Australia , 6 January 1959, aged 62 years, cause of death not yet discovered
Cemetery: Happy Valley Cemetery, Port Lincoln
Memorials: Port Lincoln & District Honor Roll WW1
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World War 1 Service

20 Mar 1916: Enlisted AIF WW1, Private, SN 5751, 48th Infantry Battalion
27 Jun 1916: Involvement Private, SN 5751, 10th Infantry Battalion
27 Jun 1916: Embarked Private, SN 5751, 10th Infantry Battalion, HMAT Barambah, Melbourne
11 Nov 1918: Involvement Private, SN 5751, 40th Infantry Battalion
17 Mar 1919: Discharged AIF WW1, Corporal, SN 5751, 48th Infantry Battalion
Date unknown: Honoured Military Medal

A Soldiers Story

Fred was born on 14 Mar 1896 at Port Lincoln to Abraham Lincoln Schramm and Catherine Schramm (nee Simes). He was the 5th youngest of 14 children in the family, 10 boys and 4 girls. His father was a farmer at Whites River
Fred went to Whites River School, leaving at grade 7. On completing his education he worked on the family farm until his enlistment in the Army on 20 Mar 1916 at the age of 20 years. At the time he gave his address as Whites River via Tumby Bay and his occupation as farmer.
After enlistment at Tumby Bay he was sent to Mitcham for processing on 23 Mar 1916 and then to 2nd Depot Battalion (Bn) to commence training on the same day. During training he was allocated to 48th Bn. On 26 Jun 16 he embarked aboard HMAT “Barambah” from Melbourne, bound for Plymouth (UK), arriving on 26 Aug 1916 and marched into 3 Training Bn (UK). On 14 Oct 1916 he embarked from UK for Etaples (Fr) and was finally taken on strength by his unit (48th Bn) on 31 Oct 1916.
The 48th Bn was raised in Egypt on 16 Mar 1916 as part of the expansion of the AIF. The unit's personnel were mainly from South Australia and Western Australia. The Bn landed in France at Marseilles on 9 Jun 1916 and within a month was committed to the front line, taking part in the battle of Pozieres, suffering 598 casualties from a total strength of 1000. It was after this battle that Fred joined his unit.
However it was a short stay, as 3 weeks later he was admitted to 3rd Stationary Army Hospital at Rouen with mumps. He was released from hospital and re-joined his unit on 7 Jan 1917. His unit at this stage was located south of Ypres and endured one of the harshest winters on record.
On 10 Apr 1917 Fred was wounded in action (WIA) at the battle of Bullecourt and was admitted through 39th Casualty Clearing Station to 1st Army General Hospital with shrapnel wounds to the face. On 5 May 1917 he was released from hospital and returned to his unit. The Bn suffered 435 casualties at Bullecourt.
On 12 Sep 1917 he was granted 10 days leave to UK. This must have been a bad omen as within a month he was again WIA (12 Oct 1917) with shrapnel and gunshot wounds to his right arm during the battle of Passchendaele; he was evacuated through 5th Field Ambulance to 5th Army General Hospital at Rouen (Fr) before being embarked aboard the HS “Grantully Castle” for the UK and admitted to 3rd War General Hospital at Devonport (UK).
Whilst still in hospital in UK he was awarded the Military Medal, the citation for which reads in part; ”At Passchendaele Ridge, North East of Oonbecke, on 12 Oct 1917 for great gallantry and devotion to duty, whilst acting as a stretcher bearer he displayed utter disregard for enemy machine gun fire. He continued carrying and caring for men found in shell holes during a heavy bombardment. His consistent bravery and skill saved the lives of many men.” He re-joined his unit on 22 Jan 1918; the medal was presented in the field.
On 3 May 1918 he was again wounded in action with shrapnel wounds and admitted through 3rd Military Hospital and then transferred to Line of Communications Hospital. He re-joined his unit on 15 Jun 1918.
On 20 Sep 1918 he was again WIA during the last major action undertaken by his unit before the end of the war. This time with shrapnel wounds to his right hand; he was evacuated aboard the HS “St Patrick” and admitted to Southern General Hospital (UK). He was then classified as medically unfit and invalided back to Australia aboard SS”Takada”, arriving in Adelaide on 4 Feb1919.
He was discharged from the Army on 17 Mar1919, returning to Tumby Bay and continued farming at Whites River with his brother Herbert (Bert). He remained on the farm until the late 40s when he was seriously injured when he fell from a dray; after recovering he retired to Port Lincoln.
On 9 Mar 1950 he married Molly Moswell in Adelaide and they returned to Port Lincoln.
He passed away on 6 Jan 1959 and is buried in the Port Lincoln (Happy Valley) Cemetery. His wife rests beside him.
Three of Fred’s brothers also served during WW1, JK , Bert and Cyril Schramm.

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Biography contributed by Geoffrey Stewart

Fred was born on 14 March 1896 at Port Lincoln to Abraham Lincoln Schramm and Catherine Schramm (nee Simes). He was the 5th youngest of 14 children in the family, 10 boys and 4 girls. His father was a farmer at Whites River

Fred went to Whites River School, leaving at grade 7.  On completing his education he worked on the family farm until his enlistment in the Army on 20 Mar 1916 at the age of 20 years. At the time he gave his address as Whites River via Tumby Bay and his occupation as farmer.

After enlistment at Tumby Bay he was sent to Mitcham for processing on 23 March 1916 and then to 2nd Depot Battalion (Bn) to commence training on the same day. During training he was allocated to  48th Bn. On 26 June 1916 he embarked aboard HMAT “Barambah” from Melbourne, bound for Plymouth (UK), arriving on 26 August 1916 and marched into 3 Training Bn (UK). On 14 October 1916 he embarked from UK for Etaples (Fr) and was finally taken on strength by his unit (48th Bn) on 31 October 1916.

The 48th Bn was raised in Egypt on 16 March 1916 as part of the expansion of the AIF. The unit's personnel were mainly from South Australia and Western Australia. The Bn landed in France at Marseilles on 9 June 1916 and within a month was committed to the front line, taking part in the battle of Pozieres, suffering 598 casualties from a total strength of 1000. It was after this battle that Fred joined his unit.

However it was a short stay, as 3 weeks later he was admitted to 3rd Stationary Army Hospital at Rouen with mumps. He was released from hospital and re-joined his unit on 7 January 1917. His unit at this stage was located south of Ypres and endured one of the harshest winters on record.  

On 10 April 1917 Fred was wounded in action (WIA) at the battle of Bullecourt and was admitted through 39th Casualty Clearing Station to 1st Army General Hospital with shrapnel wounds to the face.  On 5 May 1917 he was released from hospital and returned to his unit. The Bn suffered 435 casualties at Bullecourt.

On 12 September 1917 he was granted 10 days leave to UK. This must have been a bad omen as within a month he was again WIA (12 October 1917) with shrapnel and gunshot wounds to his right arm during the battle of Passchendaele; he was evacuated through 5th Field Ambulance to 5th Army General Hospital at Rouen (Fr) before being embarked aboard the HS “Grantully Castle” for the UK and admitted to 3rd War General Hospital at Devonport (UK).

Whilst still in hospital in UK he was awarded the Military Medal, the citation for which reads in part; ”At Passchendaele Ridge, North East of Oonbecke, on 12 October 1917 for great gallantry and devotion to duty, whilst acting as a stretcher bearer he displayed utter disregard for enemy machine gun fire. He continued carrying and caring for men found in shell holes during a heavy bombardment. His consistent bravery and skill saved the lives of many men.” He re-joined his unit on 22 January 1918; the medal was presented in the field.

On 3 May 1918 he was again wounded in action with shrapnel wounds and admitted through 3rd Military Hospital and then transferred to Line of Communications Hospital. He re-joined his unit on 15 June 1918.

On 20 September 1918 he was again WIA during the last major action undertaken by his unit before the end of the war. This time with shrapnel wounds to his right hand; he was evacuated aboard the HS “St Patrick” and admitted to Southern General Hospital (UK). He was then classified as medically unfit and invalided back to Australia aboard SS ”Takada”, arriving in Adelaide on 4 February1919.

He was discharged from the Army on 17 March 1919, returning to Tumby Bay and continued farming at Whites River with his brother Herbert (Bert). He remained on the farm until the late 1940s when he was seriously injured when he fell from a dray; after recovering he retired to Port Lincoln.

On 9 March 1950 he married Molly Moswell in Adelaide and they returned to Port Lincoln.

He passed away on 6 January 1959 and is buried in the Port Lincoln (Happy Valley) Cemetery. His wife rests beside him.

Three of Fred’s brothers also served during WW1, JK , Bert and Cyril Schramm.  

 

Medals and Decorations                                                                               

Military Medal                                                                                              

British War Medal                                                                                        

Victory Medal

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