John Francis LONG

Poppy

LONG, John Francis

Service Number: 1094
Enlisted: Not yet discovered
Last Rank: Sergeant
Last Unit: 13th Infantry Battalion
Born: Trundle New South Wales , 1892
Home Town: Trundle, Parkes, New South Wales
Schooling: Not yet discovered
Occupation: Carpenter
Died: Killed in Service, France, 27 September 1917
Cemetery: No known grave - "Known Unto God"
Panel 7-17-23-25-27-29-31
Memorials: Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour, Menin Gate Memorial (Commonwealth Memorial to the Missing of the Ypres Salient), Parkes & District Cenotaph
Show Relationships

World War 1 Service

22 Dec 1914: Involvement Private, SN 1094, 13th Infantry Battalion, Third Ypres
22 Dec 1914: Embarked Private, SN 1094, 13th Infantry Battalion, HMAT Ulysses, Melbourne
27 Sep 1917: Involvement Sergeant, SN 1094, 13th Infantry Battalion, Third Ypres

Enlistment & Service Details

1094 John Francis Long (Roman Catholic) was born in Trundle and attended Trundle Public School, New South Wales. He was the son of Michael and Mary Long of “The Cedars” Trundle NSW.

He was listed as a single Carpenter from Trundle, at his enlistment on 30 October 1914. His unit 13th Battalion, B Company embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A38 Ulysses on 22 December 1914. He service in Egypt, Gallipoli, Western Front.

Medals: 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal

He was a Sgt when he was killed in Action on 27 September 1917 at the age of 25. He was killed at Polygon Wood, Ypres, Belgium. He has no known grave.
Polygon Wood - 26 September 1917 - 03 October 1917 - The operation to secure strongly defended German positions in the vicinity of Polygon Wood and to consolidate positions on the Menin Road Ridge. Characterised by bitter fighting and fierce German counter-attacks.

A LETTER FROM A WOUNDED SOLDIER
Following are extracts from a letter from a Trundle boy at the front, the first of the wounded, Private J. Long, Heliopolis, May 3rd, 1915.

We left Egypt on the S.S. Ascot from Alexandria ,three weeks ago, and went to Lemnos Island, about 40 miles from the Dardanelles, where we stayed for ten days, waiting for good weather conditions for landing.
There were over 70 transports in the fleet, not including the warships. As an escort we had the battle squadron that is operating in the Dardanelles, including the famous Queen Elizabeth, one of Britain's finest ships. So you can guess what a lovely sight it was.
We started landing on the Gallipoli Peninsula last Sunday (25tli April) under heavy fire from our battleships, and the Turks were on the beach pouring their fire into the boats as we wont ashore.
The first contingent struck it the hardest. They went ashore first, and pretty well cleared the way for us. Our battalion did not got ashore until late in the day, but we had to start to fight as soon as we landed. We drove the Turks for about two miles inland at the point of the bayonet, but had to retire about half a mile on Sunday night, as the Turks had very strong reinforcements coming up behind them. We dug our selves in the ground there on Sunday night with our entrenching tools, and we were holding the position on Tuesday, when I had to leave.
It took two bullets to out me. One went through my left shoulder, and aa I was turned half around in the trench another struck mo in the middle of the back, and
went under my left shoulder blade. They have not taken it out yet.
We were brought back here on a lovely German passenger boat one that the British had captured. The trip back from the Dardanelles was done in record time, only taking a little over two days. There are a lot of casualties among the Australian and New Zealand troops. I think it can easily be said that the Australian’s struck the hardest part to land. There were thousands of British and French troops landed, but they did not seem to have as bad a time as we
had. I don't think it will be very long before I am at it again.

Report from: CPL R.E Chapman 1124 L.G. School 27 September 1917
Long, whose number I know quite well, was SGT in my Pl. (VI B Coy) He was in the BN football team, was tall (about 5 ft.10) thin, always smiling - his name was John. We called him called him Jack. We were at Polygon Wood, digging communication trenches to the new objective following the 3 attacking Bns. It was about 6 am on 27th September. I was digging next to Long, when a dud shell hit him in the chest on the right side and killed him instantly. He uttered no sound and fell dead alongside me. I gave his damaged wallet and pay book to the OC of the Coy. I them helped to bury him 5 yards away in No Mans Land. We made a rough cross and write his name and regiment on in pencil.

Report from and eye witness: PTE E. Claire 245 13th A.I.F Coombe Lodge Hospital, Great Warley Essex. Home Address Wyona Killop St, Geelong Victoria. 14 February 1918.
“On September 27 at Polygon Wood long was killed outright by a shell through the heart, and was buried alongside the trench, they put a little wooden cross over the grave” Description: Fair 5’11” old wound in shoulder from Gallipoli”

Report from: Pte W.S. Miller No. 2203 13th A.I.F. B Coy Australian Camp Rouelles 28th February 1918.
I was with Long at Ypres when he was acting Platoon Sergeant on about 26th September. A dud shell went clean through his back. We were digging a communications trench between the old line and the first objective. We did not have to retire. I was told by LCpl Rice who was with the Battalion that he was one of the burying party and they were taking Long away to bury him. He told me this the next morning. Long was a very popular chap, dark, about 5’11”. I think he came from Balmain, near Sydney. He worked on a farm.

Commemoration details:The Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial (Panel 17), Belgium
Remembered at the Australian War Memorial, Roll of Honour Panel number 70, Trundle War Memorial Hall Roll of Honour and Book of Remembrance and in the Avenue of Remembrance in Forbes Street Trundle .

SEARGEANT LONG KILLED ACTION. (Newspaper Report)
Mrs Long, of Trundle, has been officially informed that her second son, Sergeant J. F. Long, was killed in action on September 27th, 1917. Sergeant Long enlisted in Otctober 1914, went through his military preparations and left Australia at the end of that year. He was in the landing a Gallipoli on April 25th, 1915.

He was there only two days when he was wounded and returned to Egypt. He remained in Egypt for six weeks before returning to Gallipoli. His second period at Gallipoli carried him right up to within a fortnight of the evacuation on June, 1916. He then went to England and was camped at |Salisbury Plain for some time, but the wounds he received at Gallipoli were still giving trouble and it was found necessary for him to undergo several operations, when finally, he again became fit for active service. He then went across to France in November of last year and took part in all the engagements of the Australians from that time up to his death. It was in February of this year that he gained his stripes.

A letter received from Sergeant Merriel of Fifield, explains that Sergeant Long met his death by the explosion of a shell. He was buried at Polygon Wood, near Ypres.

The deceased soldier was a native of Forbes, and was in his 25th year. Years ago he left Forbes and took up his residence at Trundle, where he soon gained the friendship of all. The depressing effect of the news of his death on Trundle people is evidence of this noble Australian soldier's popularity. Much sympathy is expressed for the parents of deceased.



Read more...

Enlistment & Service Details

1094 John Francis Long (Roman Catholic) was born in Trundle and attended Trundle Public School, New South Wales. He was the son of Michael and Mary Long of “The Cedars” Trundle NSW.

He was listed as a single Carpenter from Trundle, at his enlistment on 30 October 1914. His unit 13th Battalion, B Company embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A38 Ulysses on 22 December 1914. He service in Egypt, Gallipoli, Western Front.

Medals: 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal

He was a Sgt when he was killed in Action on 27 September 1917 at the age of 25. He was killed at Polygon Wood, Ypres, Belgium. He has no known grave.
Polygon Wood - 26 September 1917 - 03 October 1917 - The operation to secure strongly defended German positions in the vicinity of Polygon Wood and to consolidate positions on the Menin Road Ridge. Characterised by bitter fighting and fierce German counter-attacks.

A LETTER FROM A WOUNDED SOLDIER
Following are extracts from a letter from a Trundle boy at the front, the first of the wounded, Private J. Long, Heliopolis, May 3rd, 1915.

We left Egypt on the S.S. Ascot from Alexandria ,three weeks ago, and went to Lemnos Island, about 40 miles from the Dardanelles, where we stayed for ten days, waiting for good weather conditions for landing.
There were over 70 transports in the fleet, not including the warships. As an escort we had the battle squadron that is operating in the Dardanelles, including the famous Queen Elizabeth, one of Britain's finest ships. So you can guess what a lovely sight it was.
We started landing on the Gallipoli Peninsula last Sunday (25tli April) under heavy fire from our battleships, and the Turks were on the beach pouring their fire into the boats as we wont ashore.
The first contingent struck it the hardest. They went ashore first, and pretty well cleared the way for us. Our battalion did not got ashore until late in the day, but we had to start to fight as soon as we landed. We drove the Turks for about two miles inland at the point of the bayonet, but had to retire about half a mile on Sunday night, as the Turks had very strong reinforcements coming up behind them. We dug our selves in the ground there on Sunday night with our entrenching tools, and we were holding the position on Tuesday, when I had to leave.
It took two bullets to out me. One went through my left shoulder, and aa I was turned half around in the trench another struck mo in the middle of the back, and
went under my left shoulder blade. They have not taken it out yet.
We were brought back here on a lovely German passenger boat one that the British had captured. The trip back from the Dardanelles was done in record time, only taking a little over two days. There are a lot of casualties among the Australian and New Zealand troops. I think it can easily be said that the Australian’s struck the hardest part to land. There were thousands of British and French troops landed, but they did not seem to have as bad a time as we
had. I don't think it will be very long before I am at it again.

Report from: CPL R.E Chapman 1124 L.G. School 27 September 1917
Long, whose number I know quite well, was SGT in my Pl. (VI B Coy) He was in the BN football team, was tall (about 5 ft.10) thin, always smiling - his name was John. We called him called him Jack. We were at Polygon Wood, digging communication trenches to the new objective following the 3 attacking Bns. It was about 6 am on 27th September. I was digging next to Long, when a dud shell hit him in the chest on the right side and killed him instantly. He uttered no sound and fell dead alongside me. I gave his damaged wallet and pay book to the OC of the Coy. I them helped to bury him 5 yards away in No Mans Land. We made a rough cross and write his name and regiment on in pencil.

Report from and eye witness: PTE E. Claire 245 13th A.I.F Coombe Lodge Hospital, Great Warley Essex. Home Address Wyona Killop St, Geelong Victoria. 14 February 1918.
“On September 27 at Polygon Wood long was killed outright by a shell through the heart, and was buried alongside the trench, they put a little wooden cross over the grave” Description: Fair 5’11” old wound in shoulder from Gallipoli”

Report from: Pte W.S. Miller No. 2203 13th A.I.F. B Coy Australian Camp Rouelles 28th February 1918.
I was with Long at Ypres when he was acting Platoon Sergeant on about 26th September. A dud shell went clean through his back. We were digging a communications trench between the old line and the first objective. We did not have to retire. I was told by LCpl Rice who was with the Battalion that he was one of the burying party and they were taking Long away to bury him. He told me this the next morning. Long was a very popular chap, dark, about 5’11”. I think he came from Balmain, near Sydney. He worked on a farm.

Commemoration details:The Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial (Panel 17), Belgium
Remembered at the Australian War Memorial, Roll of Honour Panel number 70, Trundle War Memorial Hall Roll of Honour and Book of Remembrance and in the Avenue of Remembrance in Forbes Street Trundle .

SEARGEANT LONG KILLED ACTION. (Newspaper Report)
Mrs Long, of Trundle, has been officially informed that her second son, Sergeant J. F. Long, was killed in action on September 27th, 1917. Sergeant Long enlisted in Otctober 1914, went through his military preparations and left Australia at the end of that year. He was in the landing a Gallipoli on April 25th, 1915.

He was there only two days when he was wounded and returned to Egypt. He remained in Egypt for six weeks before returning to Gallipoli. His second period at Gallipoli carried him right up to within a fortnight of the evacuation on June, 1916. He then went to England and was camped at |Salisbury Plain for some time, but the wounds he received at Gallipoli were still giving trouble and it was found necessary for him to undergo several operations, when finally, he again became fit for active service. He then went across to France in November of last year and took part in all the engagements of the Australians from that time up to his death. It was in February of this year that he gained his stripes.

A letter received from Sergeant Merriel of Fifield, explains that Sergeant Long met his death by the explosion of a shell. He was buried at Polygon Wood, near Ypres.

The deceased soldier was a native of Forbes, and was in his 25th year. Years ago he left Forbes and took up his residence at Trundle, where he soon gained the friendship of all. The depressing effect of the news of his death on Trundle people is evidence of this noble Australian soldier's popularity. Much sympathy is expressed for the parents of deceased.



Read more...
Showing 2 of 2 stories