Lily Mary BISHOP

BISHOP, Lily Mary

Service Numbers: Nurse, Sister
Enlisted: 4 August 1917, Victoria Barracks, Queensland
Last Rank: Nursing Sister
Last Unit: Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1)
Born: Wilcannia, New South Wales, 13 April 1880
Home Town: Mount Gambier, Mount Gambier, South Australia
Schooling: Not yet discovered
Occupation: Nurse
Died: Mount Gambier, South Australia, 10 June 1927, aged 47 years, cause of death not yet discovered
Cemetery: Mount Gambier Lake Terrace Cemetery
Memorials: Mount Gambier RSL Pictorial Honour Roll, Queensland Australian Army Nursing Service Roll of Honour
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World War 1 Service

4 Aug 1917: Involvement Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1), Nursing Sister, SN Nurse, Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1)
4 Aug 1917: Enlisted Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1), Sister, SN Sister, Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1), Victoria Barracks, Queensland
31 Aug 1917: Embarked Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1), Nursing Sister, SN Nurse, Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1), HMAT Wiltshire, Sydney
21 Feb 1920: Discharged Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1)

Obituary

Sister Lily Mary Cox (nee Bishop), who died on 10th June, 1927, was the second daughter of the late Mr. Thomas Bishop and Mrs. Bishop, of "Wurley," Grey Street, Mount Gambier. Born in Wilcannia, on the Darling River, N.S.W., in 1880, she was brought up in the South-East of South Australia. She trained for a nurse in 1903 at the Children's Hospital, North Adelaide. When she finished her training she undertook private nursing for some time, and afterwards went to the Woman's Hospital, Melbourne, where she went through a course of training in mid-wifery. She returned to Mount Gambier, and started the Mount Gambier private hospital, which she carried on for some time. She gave up the hospital work, and returned to private nursing throughout the South-East. In 1913 she went to Sydney 'or private nursing, and in 1915 went to Queensland, and was private nursing there until 1916. Sister Cox then went to Rosemount Military Hospital, and joined the Queensland A.I.F. nursing staff. In September, 1916, she left Brisbane for Sydney to join the hospital ship Karoola, and on 16th September left Sydney for overseas. On the 26th of September , the boat arrived at Fremantle, and reached Bombay on 10th October. She arrived at Poona on the 29th October, and went on duty at the station hospitals. From there on the
13th November she went on duty at the barracks hospital. After being there for some time she returned to Australia by the s.s. Dunera, and was at home from 29th June to August 3rd. On August 9th, Sister Cox went to the base hospital for orders, and on 23rd August left Melbourne for Adelaide by train in charge of wounded soldiers.

Later, she left Adelaide for Melbourne, and then on to Sydney, and on 31st August left Sydney by H.M.T. Willshire for Suez, where the boat arrived on October 5th. On the same day she left for Alexandria, and went on duty at the 17th General Hospital. Later she was transferred from Alexandria to Salonika, where she arrived on April 19th by the s.s. Gorgar. Sister Cox went from there to many other important stations, and finally to England, where she received orders to return to Australia. As soon as she arrived n Australia she got her discharge from the military authorities, and returned to her profession in a private capacity. Three years ago she was married to Mr. J. J. Cox, of Melbourne, and she resided with her husband and mother until her death.

Border Watch Saturday 18 June 1927 page 3

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Biography

Daughter of Thomas and Sophia BISHOP

Of "Wurley" Grey Street, Mt. Gambier, SA

Did not marry

SISTER LILY MARY COX.

Sister Lily Mary Cox (nee Bishop), who died on 10th June, 1927, was the second daughter of the late Mr. Thomas Bishop and Mrs. Bishop, of "Wurley," Grey Street, Mount Gambier. Born in Wilcannia, on the Darling River, N.S.W., in 1880, she was brought up in the South-East of South Australia. She trained for a nurse in 1903 at the Children's Hospital, North Adelaide. When she finished her training she undertook private nursing for some time, and afterwards went to the Woman's Hospital, Melbourne, where she went through a course of training in mid-wifery. She returned to Mount Gambier, and started the Mount Gambier private hospital, which she carried on for some time. She gave up the hospital work, and returned to private nursing throughout the South-East. In 1913 she went to Sydney 'or private nursing, and in 1915 went to Queensland, and was private nursing there until 1916. Sister Cox then went to Rosemount Military Hospital, and joined the Queensland A.I.F. nursing staff. In September, 1916, she left Brisbane for Sydney to join the hospital ship Karoola, and on 16th September left Sydney for overseas. On the 26th of September , the boat arrived at Fremantle, and reached Bombay on 10th October. She arrived at Poona on the 29th October, and went on duty at the station hospitals. From there on the
13th November she went on duty at the barracks hospital. After being there for some time she returned to Australia by the s.s. Dunera, and was at home from 29th June to August 3rd. On August 9th, Sister Cox went to the base hospital for orders, and on 23rd August left Melbourne for Adelaide by train in charge of wounded soldiers.

Later, she left Adelaide for Melbourne, and then on to Sydney, and on 31st August left Sydney by H.M.T. Willshire for Suez, where the boat arrived on October 5th. On the same day she left for Alexandria, and went on duty at the 17th General Hospital. Later she was transferred from Alexandria to Salonika, where she arrived on April 19th by the s.s. Gorgar. Sister Cox went from there to many other important stations, and finally to England, where she received orders to return to Australia. As soon as she arrived n Australia she got her discharge from the military authorities, and returned to her profession in a private capacity. Three years ago she was married to Mr. J. J. Cox, of Melbourne, and she resided with her husband and mother until her death.

Border Watch Saturday 18 June 1927 page 3

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