Lorna Blachford BACKHOUSE

BACKHOUSE, Lorna Blachford

Service Numbers: QAIMNR, AANS
Enlisted: 1 March 1915, Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Reserve - left Australia on RMS Malwa in March 1915 landing in Egypt on 1st May 1915 taking up duty at the Heliopolis Palace, No. 1 Australian General Hospital. Nurse Backhouse was about a month so employed and then went on to the Hospital trains which carried the wounded to either Cairo or Port Said, Next stop was the No. 19 General Hospital at Alexandria and after 12 months was transferred to a hospital ship followed by a further stint in Cairo. Nurse Backhouse returned to Australia on a hospital carrier.
Last Rank: Sister
Last Unit: Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1)
Born: Merriwa, New South Wales, 4 September 1881
Home Town: Tamworth, Tamworth Municipality, New South Wales
Schooling: Nursing qualifications at Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney
Occupation: Nurse
Died: Queensland, 15 August 1974, aged 92 years, cause of death not yet discovered
Cemetery: Not yet discovered
Memorials:
Show Relationships

World War 1 Service

1 Mar 1915: Enlisted Staff Nurse, SN QAIMNR, Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Reserve - left Australia on RMS Malwa in March 1915 landing in Egypt on 1st May 1915 taking up duty at the Heliopolis Palace, No. 1 Australian General Hospital. Nurse Backhouse was about a month so employed and then went on to the Hospital trains which carried the wounded to either Cairo or Port Said, Next stop was the No. 19 General Hospital at Alexandria and after 12 months was transferred to a hospital ship followed by a further stint in Cairo. Nurse Backhouse returned to Australia on a hospital carrier.
6 Apr 1915: Embarked Staff Nurse, embarked on the Malwa
19 Feb 1918: Enlisted Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1), Sister, SN AANS, Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1)
8 May 1918: Embarked Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1), Sister, SN AANS, Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1), Embarked on RMS Osterley from Sydney on 8th May 1918, disembarking Liverpool, England on 10th July 1918.
12 Jul 1918: Transferred Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1), Sister, Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1), Attached to 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Southall, England
1 Aug 1918: Embarked Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1), Sister, SN AANS, Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1), Embarked on SS Malta from England to Australia on 1st August 1918. No.2 Sea Transport Staff.
13 Oct 1918: Discharged Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1), Sister, SN AANS, Australian Army Nursing Service (WW1), Resigned appointment due to marriage 13 October 1918

THREE YEARS ON SERVICE TAMWORTH NURSE AT THE WAR. Exciting Experiences.

THREE YEARS ON SERVICE
TAMWORTH NURSE AT THE WAR.
Exciting Experiences.

After an absence of nearly three years at the war fronts, Nurse L. B Backhouse, who is on furlough, is spending a well-earned rest with her mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Backhouse, Commercial Bank, Tamworth.

In an interesting chat with a ''DailyObserver" representative, Nurse Backhouse said she left Australian shores in the "Malwa" in March, 1915, and landed in Egypt on 1st May just after the Gallipoli landing. They were really on their way to England, said Nurse Backhouse, but their services were required so badly that orders were given for their disembarkation immediately, and they went to work straight away. Hundreds of wounded came direct from the Peninsula to Cairo, and Nurse Backhouse took up duty at the Heliopolis Palace, No. 1 Australian General Hospital.

Nurse Backhouse was about a month so employed and then went on to the Hospital trains which carried the wounded to the different hospitals as they were landed from the troop and hospital ships in Alexandria harbor. The patients were either taken to Cairo and Port Said, on intervening stations where there were convalescent hospitals established. The trains were beautifully fitted up and very comfortable. When matters became somewhat normal Nurse Backhouse went on to No. 19 General Hospital at Alexandria, and was there when a large number of badly wounded came forward as a result of the Suvla landing. This was a beautiful hospital — a hospital conducted by Germans in peace times, and it was splendidly run. The patients were mostly English boys, but there was a little crowd of Australians, a happy lot of boys, and the "Australian corner" it was generally named. The Australians always seemed to progress well and they were a very contented and happy lot. After 12 months' service at this institution Nurse Backhouse's activities were transferred to a hospital ship. The ship was splendidly fitted up with everything necessary for the care and comfort of the sick and wounded. Cot cases were all in swinging cots.

Nurse Backhouse was enthusiastic over the good work of the Red Cross. She really did not know how they could do without them. The worst time she had was the run across to Salonika in the hospital ship where they took on board a greater number of sick than wounded, suffering from malaria and dysentry. It took about a week to load the ship's complement, and while in the harbor it was so hot they frequently took a run outside to obtain a breath of fresh breeze. These were the boys who appreciated the hospital ship. "The most exciting part of my experience,'' said Nurse Backhouse, "was returning from Salonika to Malta. One evening about 7 o'clock the S.O.S. signal reached us and our boat turned back 70 miles and picked up two crews who were on rafts and in life boats. It was about midnight when we came upon them, and it was a difficult matter to locate them and pick them up. Two boats had been submarined and we just managed to arrive opportunely. As ours was a full ship rough beds had to be made along the decks. Part of the survivors comprised Lascars, and they had all their belongings. They would rather lose their lives than their belongings, and the remainder of the crew were Englishmen, and they did not have a stitch of anything." Nurse Backhouse left the ship for hospital work at Cairo. They had a very heavy time after the Gaza fight in the Desert. "People generally imagine," said Miss Backhouse, "that the soldiers in Egypt have an easy time compared with those on French soil, but such is not the case. The food is not good, they have a particularly hard time in the Desert. Water is scarce and men suffer severely from sun stroke and dysentry. The Australian soldier is a fine stamp of man, who through all his trials and sufferings never grumbles. It is simply marvellous what they went through, and never a murmur."

Nurse Backhouse returned to Australia on a hospital carrier — a troopship roughly fitted up, which carried about 600 wounded. Provision was made for 80 cot cases. The patients did well after a week at sea. They had most enthusiastic welcomes from the Red Cross at Colombo, Fremantle, Melbourne, and Sydney. Fruit, eggs and cigarettes in abundance were supplied and the patients were entertained by motor drives through all the cities. At Ceylon 100 deck chairs were presented to the ship and each soldier received 1lb. of Ceylon tea. Those who could not go ashore at all places of call were visited by Red Cross ladies, who handed round provisions and attended to any little wants. Nurse Backhouse referred to the Turkish wounded and said they were contented and happy in hospital, and always willing to work and anxious to please and what one may term "real sports." In conclusion Nurse Backhouse stated that the Red Cross and Y.M.C.A. rooms were a great boon to the men, and they took full advantage of the comforts and recreations provided. Nurse Backhouse's furlough is coming
to an end, and she is to report for duty at the end of the present month for further service.

Daily Observer Saturday 26 January 1918 page 3

Read more...
Showing 1 of 1 story

Biography contributed by Sharyn Roberts

THREE YEARS ON SERVICE
TAMWORTH NURSE AT THE WAR.
Exciting Experiences.

After an absence of nearly three years at the war fronts, Nurse L. B Backhouse, who is on furlough, is spending a well-earned rest with her mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Backhouse, Commercial Bank, Tamworth.

In an interesting chat with a ''DailyObserver" representative, Nurse Backhouse said she left Australian shores in the "Malwa" in March, 1915, and landed in Egypt on 1st May just after the Gallipoli landing. They were really on their way to England, said Nurse Backhouse, but their services were required so badly that orders were given for their disembarkation immediately, and they went to work straight away. Hundreds of wounded came direct from the Peninsula to Cairo, and Nurse Backhouse took up duty at the Heliopolis Palace, No. 1 Australian General Hospital.

Nurse Backhouse was about a month so employed and then went on to the Hospital trains which carried the wounded to the different hospitals as they were landed from the troop and hospital ships in Alexandria harbor. The patients were either taken to Cairo and Port Said, on intervening stations where there were convalescent hospitals established. The trains were beautifully fitted up and very comfortable. When matters became somewhat normal Nurse Backhouse went on to No. 19 General Hospital at Alexandria, and was there when a large number of badly wounded came forward as a result of the Suvla landing. This was a beautiful hospital — a hospital conducted by Germans in peace times, and it was splendidly run. The patients were mostly English boys, but there was a little crowd of Australians, a happy lot of boys, and the "Australian corner" it was generally named. The Australians always seemed to progress well and they were a very contented and happy lot. After 12 months' service at this institution Nurse Backhouse's activities were transferred to a hospital ship. The ship was splendidly fitted up with everything necessary for the care and comfort of the sick and wounded. Cot cases were all in swinging cots.

Nurse Backhouse was enthusiastic over the good work of the Red Cross. She really did not know how they could do without them. The worst time she had was the run across to Salonika in the hospital ship where they took on board a greater number of sick than wounded, suffering from malaria and dysentry. It took about a week to load the ship's complement, and while in the harbor it was so hot they frequently took a run outside to obtain a breath of fresh breeze. These were the boys who appreciated the hospital ship. "The most exciting part of my experience,'' said Nurse Backhouse, "was returning from Salonika to Malta. One evening about 7 o'clock the S.O.S. signal reached us and our boat turned back 70 miles and picked up two crews who were on rafts and in life boats. It was about midnight when we came upon them, and it was a difficult matter to locate them and pick them up. Two boats had been submarined and we just managed to arrive opportunely. As ours was a full ship rough beds had to be made along the decks. Part of the survivors comprised Lascars, and they had all their belongings. They would rather lose their lives than their belongings, and the remainder of the crew were Englishmen, and they did not have a stitch of anything." Nurse Backhouse left the ship for hospital work at Cairo. They had a very heavy time after the Gaza fight in the Desert. "People generally imagine," said Miss Backhouse, "that the soldiers in Egypt have an easy time compared with those on French soil, but such is not the case. The food is not good, they have a particularly hard time in the Desert. Water is scarce and men suffer severely from sun stroke and dysentry. The Australian soldier is a fine stamp of man, who through all his trials and sufferings never grumbles. It is simply marvellous what they went through, and never a murmur."

Nurse Backhouse returned to Australia on a hospital carrier — a troopship roughly fitted up, which carried about 600 wounded. Provision was made for 80 cot cases. The patients did well after a week at sea. They had most enthusiastic welcomes from the Red Cross at Colombo, Fremantle, Melbourne, and Sydney. Fruit, eggs and cigarettes in abundance were supplied and the patients were entertained by motor drives through all the cities. At Ceylon 100 deck chairs were presented to the ship and each soldier received 1lb. of Ceylon tea. Those who could not go ashore at all places of call were visited by Red Cross ladies, who handed round provisions and attended to any little wants. Nurse Backhouse referred to the Turkish wounded and said they were contented and happy in hospital, and always willing to work and anxious to please and what one may term "real sports." In conclusion Nurse Backhouse stated that the Red Cross and Y.M.C.A. rooms were a great boon to the men, and they took full advantage of the comforts and recreations provided. Nurse Backhouse's furlough is coming to an end, and she is to report for duty at the end of the present month for further service.

Daily Observer Saturday 26 January 1918 page 3

Read more...

Biography contributed by Daryl Jones

Born on the 4th of September 1881 at the Commercial Bank, Merriwa, NSW (reg. Cassilis) Religion: Church of England

Died on the 15th of August 1974 in Qld Cremated at the Albany Creek Crematorium, Aspley, Brisbane

Occupation – Registered Nurse

Daughter of Ernest Benjamin BACKHOUSE and Ida Frances WANT – who married in Paddington, NSW in 1880 Ernest, a retired Bank Manager of the Commercial Bank, died on the 8/4/1925 at his home in Neutral Bay, aged 69. Ida died on the 31/7/1952

Siblings:

  • Eric Blachford b.1883 Cassilis – d.1964;
  • Norman Blachford b.1884 Lismore – d.1958;
  • Mabel Blachford b.1886 Lismore;
  • Constance Blachford b.1888 Lismore;
  • Harold Blachford b.1890 Lismore

Married Harry Pitt LORD on the 17th of October 1918 at St Chad’s, Cremorne, NSW

Children:

  • Jean Frances – (WAAF) – married Henry A.L. LOVELL 1943;
  • John Paxton b.19/12/1921 Tamworth – WW2: Lieut 359 Aus Hvy A A TP [NOK: Harry]
  • Peter Simeon Charles b.1922  d.1930
Read more...