Clarence Brushfield SHEPLEY

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SHEPLEY, Clarence Brushfield

Service Number: 62348
Enlisted: 13 May 1918, South Australia
Last Rank: Private
Last Unit: 1st to 6th (SA) Reinforcements
Born: Norwood, South Australia, 12 February 1899
Home Town: Rose Park, South Australia
Schooling: Rose Park & Pulteney St Public Schools
Occupation: Draftsman
Died: Pneumonia, France, 26 July 1919, aged 20 years
Cemetery: St. Pierre Cemetery, Amiens
Plot 16, Row A, Grave 2
Memorials: Adelaide Crown Lands Department WW1 Honour Board, Adelaide National War Memorial, Australian War Memorial, Roll of Honour, Rose Park Burnside District Fallen Soldiers' Memorial
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World War 1 Service

13 May 1918: Enlisted AIF WW1, South Australia
31 Aug 1918: Involvement AIF WW1, Private, SN 62348, 1st to 6th (SA) Reinforcements
31 Aug 1918: Embarked AIF WW1, Private, SN 62348, 1st to 6th (SA) Reinforcements, HMAT Barambah, Melbourne
26 Jul 1919: Involvement AIF WW1, Private, SN 62348

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Biography

Clarence Brushfield SHEPLEY was born on 12th February, 1899 in Norwood, South Australia to his parents Frank Shepley and Annie Coleman. He had blue eyes and dark brown hair. He was born into a religious family, who were members of the Church of England. He was sent to school at Rose Park then Pulteney Public School. Before enlisting for the army, Clarence was a Draftsman, meaning he drafted / made plans and legal documents for the government.

He had previous service with the 28th Signal Company, Army Engineers (CMF) and also served in the Cadets

He enlisted on 13th May 1918 at age 19 and 3 months - 5th South Australian Re-inforcements - Unit which embarked from Melbourne on HMAT Barambah on 31st August 1918 - he transferred to Graves Registration Detachment -27th Battalion. His service number was 62348. He arrived in London on the 14th of November 1918. At some stage during his journey to France, he was hospitalized with Influenza. He was discharged from the hospital ship on the 12th of October 1918 and then disembarked in London one month and two days later. He was then transferred again under paragraph 962 from 27th battalion to head quarters on the 30th of November. Clarence was transferred for the third time to the “2 group” (B group) on the 23rd of June 1919.

On the 25th of June his army moved in from Tidworth, but seventeen days later he was admitted into hospital for the second time on his journey. On the 22nd, while in France, he was diagnosed with Pneumonia and passed away four days later, on the 26th at the 41st General Hospital in France and is buried in St Pierre Cemetery, Amiens, France and his grave details are Plot 16, Row A, Grave 2. 

The roll of honor states that he Served on the War Graves Detachment for 27th Battalion and died of pneumonia at 4th Stationary Hospital, France, on 26 July 1919 and was listed as number 185.

His brother Private Reginald SHEPLEY was killed in action in Poziers in 1916 and a cousin Thomas Alan SHEPLEY was killed in action in Gallipoli in 1915

IN MEMORIAM - The Register South Australia -26th July 1920

SHEPLEY - In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. Clarence B Shepley who died of pneumonia at the 41st General Hospital, France on the 26th July 1919

ANZAC stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. His ANZAC spirit was represented in how he went to war, possibly not knowing of the dangers that lay ahead of him. Although he did not actualy fight in the war he showed bravery by putting his hand up. Clarence had to have country pride to take a courageous act such as this. Australia was fighting in this war because they were with the British army.

COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/205131/SHEPLEY,%20CLARENCE%20BRUSHFIELD (www.cwgc.org)

WAR DOSSIER - Australian National Archives - 5o pages

http://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=8081799 (recordsearch.naa.gov.au)

 

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