Frederick Melancthon MILGATE MID

MILGATE, Frederick Melancthon

Service Number: 934
Enlisted: 19 August 1914, An original member of H Company
Last Rank: Sergeant
Last Unit: 7th Infantry Battalion
Born: Moama, New South Wales, Australia, 12 February 1889
Home Town: Moama, Riverina, New South Wales
Schooling: Tatalia Public School, New South Wales, Australia
Occupation: Farmer
Died: Killed in action, France, 9 August 1918, aged 29 years
Cemetery: Heath Cemetery, Picardie
Plot III, Row J, Grave No. 11. TO LIVE IN THE HEARTS WE LEAVE BEHIND IS NOT TO DIE.
Memorials: Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour, Echuca War Memorial, Loyal Echuca Lodge M.U.I.O.O.F. No. 5349 Honor Roll, Moama Tataila Public School Roll of Honor
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World War 1 Service

19 Aug 1914: Enlisted AIF WW1, Private, 934, 7th Infantry Battalion, An original member of H Company
19 Oct 1914: Involvement Private, 934, 7th Infantry Battalion
19 Oct 1914: Embarked Private, 934, 7th Infantry Battalion, HMAT Hororata, Melbourne
9 Aug 1918: Involvement Sergeant, 934, 7th Infantry Battalion

Help us honour Frederick Melancthon Milgate's service by contributing information, stories, and images so that they can be preserved for future generations.

Biography contributed by Stephen Brooks

There were four men from Moama named Milgate who died with the AIF during WW1. They were all first cousins, two pairs of brothers.

Frederick Milgate’s brother, 2199 Pte Ernest Albert Milgate, 60th Battalion AIF, had been killed in action at Bullecourt, 12 May 1917, aged 33.

Frederick Milgate was one the first Australians to enlist and served at the Anzac landing with the 7th Battalion, being wounded on that first day, (flesh contusions and wounds) and evacuated back to Egypt. He returned to Gallipoli during June 1915 and was again wounded during the Lone Pine Battle and was eventually evacuated with dysentery during late September. He did return to Gallipoli and served through until the evacuation.

Frederick seemed to be born for soldiering. He was promoted to Corporal then Sergeant during 1916 and was several times recommended for gallantry awards during the heavy fighting around Pozieres. He was officially mentioned in despatches and awarded the French Medaille Militaire.

He was sadly lost in late 1918 near Harbonnieres. Several men in his Red Cross file stated that he was killed by an aeroplane bomb during an advance. One man noted “Milgate was one of the finest men in the Battalion.”

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