Philip CARROLL

Badge Number: S11694, Sub Branch: Hindmarsh
S11694

CARROLL, Philip

Service Number: 12602
Enlisted: Not yet discovered
Last Rank: Corporal
Last Unit: 11th Field Ambulance
Born: Bailieborough, Cavan, Ireland, 1872
Home Town: Port Lincoln, Port Lincoln, South Australia
Schooling: Not yet discovered
Occupation: Railway Employee
Memorials: Port Lincoln S.A.R. Eyre's Peninsula Division Roll of Honour WW1
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World War 1 Service

30 Jun 1916: Involvement Private, SN 12602, 11th Field Ambulance
30 Jun 1916: Embarked Private, SN 12602, 11th Field Ambulance, HMAT Berrima, Melbourne
11 Nov 1918: Involvement Corporal, SN 12602, 11th Field Ambulance

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Biography

Medals: British War Medal, Victory Medal

Biography contributed by Blackwood High School

World War one (also known as The Great War) was a worldwide war that began on the 28th of July, 1914 and ended on the 11th of November 1918. Philip Carroll was a private solider for the Australian Imperial Force who won a Victory Medal and a British War Medal. World War one had a dramatic effect on the soldiers’ lives, family and the community around them.

Philip Carroll was a private solider who was enlisted for World War One in 1915 at the age of 43. Philip returned to Australia in 1919, four months after the war ended. Philip won two medals during his fight, which included the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. Philip was placed into the 3rd Sanitation Section Unit and served on the Western Front for the Australian Imperial Force.

War has a massive impact on soldiers and the people close to them. Soldiers who fought in World War one were affected, including severe physical injuries that forced them to change their life forever. They were also affected tremendously mentally as when the soldiers returned form war, many of the soldiers were suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder as they spent their days at war experiencing screams of agony and pain while thinking about their own death. Some men recovered completely, while still having flashbacks and nightmares, while other men broke down and haven’t fully recovered. Life was never the same for the soldiers and their family.

World War one had a major impact on the families of soldiers that fought. When the soldiers went to war, the women in the families were forced to take over the men’s work roles so they could support their family. This meant that the older children were left to look after the younger children and take care of the household chores. When the soldiers came home from war, they often had missing limbs, were in shock from the torment of the war, suffering from the gases they were exposed to, had depression, were having constant flashbacks or had Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Some children were confused about their father’s condition when they returned as they did not understand the effects of trauma and didn’t know how to communicate with their fathers.

With all of the effects of war on the soldiers, when they returned the women still had to work to support their family as the father’s health conditions prevented them from working. Some men would experience horrible flashbacks that would keep them from doing normal day to day things as it could trigger trauma or torture that the soldiers went through.

Withdrawing this many men from communities around Australia had a dramatic effect on the workforce. Women were forced to take over the men’s work roles and no one was left to do housework or look after the children.

The ANZAC legend (also known as the ANZAC Spirit) was invented on the 25th of April of 1915. The ANZAC legend is a concept highlighting that the Australian and New Zealand soldiers (specifically soldiers who fought in World War One together) have shown great courage, endurance, initiative, discipline and mateship. The ANZAC legend is still used for Australian Soldiers who show excellent qualities.

In summary, World War One had a significant impact on the soldiers and officers, as well as their families, the community, the workforce and the day to day lives of thousands of people. This impact continued for many years after the end of the war and has changed society.

 

 

 

 

Bibliography;

Dawn of the Legend: The Anzac spirit | Australian War Memorial. 2016. Dawn of the Legend: The Anzac spirit | Australian War Memorial. [ONLINE] Available at: https://www.awm.gov.au/exhibitions/dawn/spirit/. [Accessed 22 June 2016].

World War 1 - Experiences on the Western Front. 2016. Impact on Soldiers and their Families - World War 1 - Experiences on the Western Front. [ONLINE] Available at: http://experiencesonthewesternfront.weebly.com/impact-on-soldiers-and-their-families.html. [Accessed 22 June 2016].

RSL Virtual War Memorial | Australian Soldiers, Memorials and Military History. 2016. RSL Virtual War Memorial | Australian Soldiers, Memorials and Military History. [ONLINE] Available at: https://rslvirtualwarmemorial.org.au/#show-sign-in-dialog. [Accessed 21 June 2016].

2016. Details. [ONLINE] Available at: https://aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=47237. [Accessed 23 June 2016].

William, Sydney Australia. 2016. The Anzac legend, Gallipoli and the ANZACs, Australia and World War I, History Year 9, NSW | Online Education Home Schooling Skwirk Australia. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.skwirk.com/p-c_s-14_u-42_t-46_c-136/the-anzac-legend/nsw/the-anzac-legend/australia-and-world-war-i/gallipoli-and-the-anzacs. [Accessed 20 June 2016].

 

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