Alexander Smith (Alick) GILVEAR

GILVEAR, Alexander Smith

Service Number: 4496
Enlisted: 15 October 1915
Last Rank: Lance Corporal
Last Unit: 9th Infantry Battalion
Born: Perthshire, Scotland, October 1894
Home Town: Glass House Mountains, Sunshine Coast, Queensland
Schooling: Public School, Scotland
Occupation: Labourer
Died: Killed in Action, France - Bullecourt II, 7 May 1917
Cemetery: No known grave - "Known Unto God"
Australian National Memorial, Villers-Bretonneux, France, Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, Villers-Bretonneux, Picardie, France
Memorials: Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour, Bundaberg Fairymead Sugar Company WW1 Honour Roll, Glass House Mountains RSL Honour Roll, Villers-Bretonneux Memorial (Australian National Memorial - France)
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World War 1 Service

15 Oct 1915: Enlisted AIF WW1, Private, 4496, 9th Infantry Battalion
31 Jan 1916: Involvement Private, 4496, 9th Infantry Battalion
31 Jan 1916: Embarked Private, 4496, 9th Infantry Battalion, HMAT Wandilla, Brisbane
15 Mar 1917: Promoted AIF WW1, Lance Corporal, 9th Infantry Battalion
7 May 1917: Involvement Lance Corporal, 4496, 9th Infantry Battalion

LCpl Alick Gilvear

4496 Private (Pte)(later Lance Corporal) Alexander (Alick) Smith Gilvear, 9th Battalion. Pte Gilvear was a labourer from the Glass House Mountains, Queensland when he enlisted in October 1915, the first of his family to do so. Over the next six months four of his brothers enlisted. They were followed by his father, who left his wife with three girls and a boy, all under 16, to carry on the work of the farm. Lance Corporal Gilvear was also the first of his family to die, being killed in action on 7th May 1917. On 2nd June 1917 The Queenslander newspaper carried the following Roll of Honour notice: "GILVEAR. Killed in action, in France, on May 7th, 1917, Lance-Corporal Alexander Smith Gilvear, third son of Private Thomas Gilvear and of Christina Gilvear, Glass House Mountains, age 22 years and 6 months. Much and deeply regretted. His King and country called him / The call was not in vain / And on Queensland's Roll of Honour / You will find dear Alick's name. Until we meet in Heaven above, Alick. Inserted by his sorrowing mother, sisters, and brother." The following year two of his brothers, 65 Corporal Kenneth Gilvear and 2428 Pte Robert Gilvear, were also to die; his father and two remaining brothers returned to Australia in 1919.

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Biography contributed by Evan Evans

From 49th Bn Association LCpl Alexander Smith Gilvear and his family

A studio portrait from the Australian War Memorial collection (Photo 1), on a memorial card, shows Private (Pte)(later Lance Corporal) Alexander (Alick) Smith GILVEAR (4496), 9th Battalion (Photo 2). Pte GILVEAR was a labourer from the Glass House Mountains, Queensland when he enlisted in October 1915, the first of his family to do so. Over the next six months four of his brothers enlisted. They were followed by his father, who left his wife with three girls and a boy, all under 16, to carry on the work of the farm. Photo (3) of Thomas (Senior) of his wife, the 3 daughters and son (showing his loyalty) from adoptadigger collection. Lance Corporal Alick GILVEAR was also the first of his family to die, being killed in action on 7th May 1917. On 2nd June 1917 The Queenslander newspaper carried the following Roll of Honour notice:
"GILVEAR. Killed in action, in France, on May 7th, 1917, Lance-Corporal Alexander Smith Gilvear, third son of Private Thomas Gilvear and of Christina Gilvear, Glass House Mountains, age 22 years and 6 months. Much and deeply regretted. His King and country called him / The call was not in vain / And on Queensland's Roll of Honour / You will find dear Alick's name. Until we meet in Heaven above, Alick. Inserted by his sorrowing mother, sisters, and brother."
The following year two of his brothers, Corporal Kenneth GILVEAR (65) (11th Machine Gun Company) and Private Robert GILVEAR (2428) (49th Battalion) were also to die. Their effects didn't make it home. His father, Private Thomas GILVEAR (Senior) (6967) (5th Battalion) and two remaining brothers, Thomas GLIVEAR 2876) (4th Pioneer Battalion) and Private John GILVEAR (66) (11 Machine Gun Company) returned to Australia in 1919.
The photo (4) and (5) of the front and back of the badge from adopt a digger collection shows that it was presented to Christina on behalf of the Glasshouse Mountains community. It appears that one of the symbols on the badge, now chipped, was of the 49th Battalion to acknowledge Robert.
Lest We Forget

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