Samuel Douglas Johnstone (Doug) FIGGIS

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FIGGIS, Samuel Douglas Johnstone

Service Number: 2151
Enlisted: 13 March 1915, Melbourne, Vic.
Last Rank: Private
Last Unit: 5th Infantry Battalion
Born: Balaclava, Vic., 10 August 1895
Home Town: Canterbury, Boroondara, Victoria
Schooling: Hawthorn College and Trinity Grammar School Kew
Occupation: Assistant Librarian at Melbourne Public Library
Died: Died of wounds, Gallipoli, Gallipoli, Dardanelles, Turkey, 10 August 1915, aged 20 years
Cemetery: Beach Cemetery - ANZAC Cove
II F 16, Beach Cemetery, Gallipoli Peninsula, Canakkale Province, Turkey
Memorials: Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour, Camberwell War Memorial, Public Library and National Museum of Victoria
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World War 1 Service

13 Mar 1915: Enlisted AIF WW1, Private, SN 2151, 5th Infantry Battalion, Melbourne, Vic.
25 Jun 1915: Involvement Private, SN 2151, 5th Infantry Battalion, 'ANZAC' / Gallipoli
25 Jun 1915: Embarked Private, SN 2151, 5th Infantry Battalion, HMAT Ceramic, Sydney

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Biography contributed by Faithe Jones

Son of Arthur Johnstone and Ada Jane FIGGIS, "Highbury", Wattle Valley Road, Canterbury, Victoria

WHO DIES FOR HIM SHALL EVER LIVE, WHO LIVES FOR HIM SHALL NEVER DIE

Samuel was struck by a bomb whilst in charge of his observation post.  He died next day on his 20th birthday at the Clearing Hospital on the beach.

He won a State Scholarship from the Canterbury State School, passed Junior Public in 12 subjects and Senior Public in 8 subjects and had just completed preparations for entering the university  for a science course when he enlisted.

A comrade wrote:
"We came through a pretty heavy bombardment; I was not feeling too happy, but I looked at Doug, and he never turned a hair; be was as calm as if on parade." Coy. Sgt.-major wrote: "I cannot tell  you how much his men missed him; he was liked by all." Col. Le Maistre wrote: "He died like a hero at his post." Major Stewart says: "Your son was highly spoken of by his officers and men. He did his  job and died a man's death, at his post." He was an ardent stamp collector, and a member of the junior Philatelic Society. While naturally a student, he was fond of all sport, and was a capable cricketer and tennis player.

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