James ANDERSON

Poppy

ANDERSON, James

Service Number: 772
Enlisted: 31 August 1914, Enlisted at Melbourne, Victoria
Last Rank: Private
Last Unit: 7th Infantry Battalion
Born: Newtonmore, Inverness-shire, Scotland, United Kingdom, 1891
Home Town: Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria
Schooling: Not yet discovered
Occupation: Law Clerk
Died: Killed in action, Gallipoli, Ottoman Empire, 25 April 1915
Cemetery: Lone Pine Memorial
No known grave Panel 28
Memorials: Lone Pine Memorial to the Missing
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World War 1 Service

31 Aug 1914: Enlisted AIF WW1, Private, SN 772, Enlisted at Melbourne, Victoria
19 Oct 1914: Involvement Private, SN 772, 7th Infantry Battalion, ANZAC Gallipoli
19 Oct 1914: Embarked Private, SN 772, 7th Infantry Battalion, HMAT Hororata, Melbourne

Help us honour James Anderson's service by contributing information, stories, and images so that they can be preserved for future generations.

Biography contributed by Geoffrey Gillon

(Glasgow Herald 21st May 1915)
"Private James Anderson, 7th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, has been killed in action in the Dardanelles. Private Anderson, who was the younger son of Mr John Anderson, Private Hotel, Newtonmore, served his law apprenticeship in the office of the late Mr Thomas Gibson, solicitor, Kingussie. Emigrating to Australia some years ago he took up farming, but priot to mobilisation he again resumed his connection with the legal profession."

Biography contributed by Geoffrey Gillon

He was 23 and the son of John and Mary Anderson.

He is remembered on the Newtonmore War Memorial which stands in the centre of the village of Newtonmore , beside the Village Hall. It is a Celtic cross in grey granite, seventeen feet tall.


Another Australian Great War casualty is also so honoured here. He is Private James Budge of the 27th Bn. Australian Infantry, A.I.F., Service Number 5811. who died 20/09/1917.

Subscriptions were collected in 1920 and the memorial was unveiled on 5 January 1921 by Mrs Macpherson, the wife of the local landowner. The ceremony was attended by the three ministers in Newtonmore and a large crowd, many of whom were relatives of those whose names appear on the memorial. Most of the local men who joined up had been in the Territorials. Of the twenty eight men who died in World War I, thirteen served in the Cameron Highlanders who suffered losses in the Battles of Neuve Chapelle and Festubert in 1915.

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