Harry RITCHIE MM

Badge Number: 22529, Sub Branch: Plympton
22529

RITCHIE, Harry

Service Number: 732
Enlisted: 17 February 1916, Broken Hill, New South Wales
Last Rank: Private
Last Unit: 43rd Infantry Battalion
Born: Broken Hill, New South Wales, 18 October 1893
Home Town: Broken Hill, Broken Hill Municipality, New South Wales
Schooling: Not yet discovered
Occupation: Trolley Driver (Murphy Fromen & Co)
Died: Natural causes, Adelaide, South Australia, 22 March 1973, aged 79 years
Cemetery: Enfield Memorial Park, S.A.
Anglican, Stevenson Garden, V, 1
Memorials:
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World War 1 Service

17 Feb 1916: Enlisted AIF WW1, Private, SN 732, Broken Hill, New South Wales
9 Jun 1916: Embarked AIF WW1, Private, SN 732, 43rd Infantry Battalion, HMAT Afric, Adelaide
9 Jun 1916: Involvement AIF WW1, Private, SN 732, 43rd Infantry Battalion, Enlistment/Embarkation WW1
4 Oct 1917: Honoured Military Medal, Broodseinde Ridge, "...during advance on Zonnebeke... engaging enemy machine guns...
17 Oct 1917: Wounded AIF WW1, Private, SN 732, 43rd Infantry Battalion, Third Ypres, GSW (temple)
1 Sep 1918: Wounded AIF WW1, Private, SN 732, 43rd Infantry Battalion, Mont St Quentin / Peronne, 2nd occasion- GSW (left shoulder)
28 Jun 1919: Discharged AIF WW1, Private, SN 732, 43rd Infantry Battalion

Harry Ritchie MM Biography UPDATE

AIF Pte Ritchie, Harry, 43rd Battalion, D Company, XV Platoon Lewis Gun Section
Occupation : Trolley Driver for Murphy Fromen & Co Ltd, Blende & Beryls Streets, Broken Hill, NSW ; Distributors of Poultry, Fruits & Iced, Products ;
Residence: 151 Oxide Street, Broken Hill, New South Wales
( later 163 Oxide Street, Broken Hill, New South Wales ; whilst giving Red Cross evidence of JE Curtis wounded &or Missing 1918 Sep 14 at the Cheltenham Racecourse Hospital :
as a result of his 3rd wounding left Shoulder “gsw” ; possibly failed frontal attack Scutari Trench, after successful Kassa & Usler Trenches attacks, Mont St Quentin 1918Aug31 ) ;
Born: 18 October 1893 Broken Hill, New South Wales
Religion : Methodist ( Thomas Street )
School :
Son of William Ritchie, Fruiterer ( born Angas Fillen, Aberdeen, Scotland ) & Sarah Ann Starr ( born near Adelaide, Campbelltown )
Marital Status : Single
Next of kin: Father : William Ritchie & Mother : Sarah Ann nee Starr, 151 Oxide Street, Broken Hill, New South Wales
Enlisted AIF : 17 February 1916
Morphettville, South Australia, Camp Training Base Infantry D Coy : 7 March 1916
Embarked: 9 June 1916 HMAT A19 Afric, Adelaide, South Australia
Age at embarkation : 22
Returned: 14 May 1919 Shropshire, Melbourne ; 28 June 1919 Discharged ;
Served : Western Front : France, Belgium
participated in 9 of 10 Attacks ( 1917 March 27 - 1918 September 1 ) with the 43rd Battalion AIF, including :-
1917 October 3 " Advance on Zonnebeke " from Polygon Wood to Broodseinde / Oct 4 awarded Military Medal at victorious Battle of Broodseinde Crossroads & Ridge ( pill boxes, Hill 40 - Windmill Cabaret ) 43rd Battalion extended to Tyne Cott by Oct 13 - 15, 1917 ; developed into 2 of 5 failed Attacks ( last 4 spear headed by the Canadians Oct 26, Oct 30 ; only Nov 6 & Nov 10 were temporarily successful ) ; Passchendaele I ( Oct 9 ) or II ( Oct 12 ) 1st & 2nd woundings at 3rd Battle of Ypres ( Ypres III ) ;
1918 September 1 : successful Kassa Trench & failed Scutari Trench Attacks ( 3rd wounding ) ; later successful via Usler Trench only AFTER German Prussian Guards MGs subdued by 2nd Div when recaptured Mont St Quentin ( wrong tactically thought previous morning of 5.30am Sep1 to be already in Australian hands ) ;
Medals : Military Medal, 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal
Death: 1973 March 22 Adelaide South Australia
Buried : Enfield Memorial Park, Browning Street, Clearview SA 5085
Place of Burial : Anglican, Stevenson Garden, V, 1

Read more...

1917 AIF OPERATIONS Oct3 Zonnebeke & MM Oct4 Broodseinde to Oct12 Passchendaele II & Ravebeek Valley 2nd wounding ( 3rd wounding 1918Sep1 Scutari Trench / Mont St Quentin added to 1917Oct CENTENARIES for completeness ) :-

In Solemn & Revered Memory of ALL whom, fought, wounded, maimed &or died, for the love of God, King, Country &or Comrades, in ALL Wars & Conflicts

JMW = addition/s &or ( ) for clarity

1917 Oct 4
The Great War Forum Limited
Posted 03 February 2010 - 01:27 AM

Ray,

The 43rd Bn led the 11th Bde attack at Broodseinde in phase 1 of the attack. This was on the right of the 3 Div area. Looking at Mick's map above, the 43rd start line was about 200 yards W of the road that runs NW past Hill 40 and they attacked with the railway on their right. Their left was just N of Windmill Caberet, roughly along the line of the blue dotted Uudah (?) track (duckboard) running NE in the map. They met resistance almost immediately from the station on their right and from the rise at Windmill Caberet (Hill 40), both of which were quickly overcome, they passed through Alma and stopped to the NE of it, where the 42nd Battalion took over the advance in phase II. This might narrow down your search area a bit.

Cheers
Chris

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2017 AWM Bean Narrations by Jeff M. Weeks / Cowandilla Nominees Pty. Ltd. A.B.N. 64 008 081 838

1917 Oct 4
AWM Bean Vol4 Ch XX Third Step-Broodseinde Ridge ( Attack )

pg17 of 49 " The advance of I Anzac had brought it, in this first stage, across remnants of the Flandern I line, and many pillboxes had consequently been met; ( Godley's ) I1 Anzac did not at this stage meet this line. On its front the resistance came first from the crest of Windmill Cabaret ridge, where this had not been seized on September 26th. ( Plumer's Step 2 [ of 3 ] Polygon Wood / The Buttes ( near Zonnebeke ) ] The II Anzac barrage was perceptibly denser than that of I An officer of the 43rd Battalion describes it as 'like a wall of flame.'

( pg12 of 49 " Some twenty officers are known to have been killed by the bombardment, and about a seventh of the attacking force of I Anzac appears to have been killed or wounded.
( North of the railway outside the area of intense barrage Capt F G Sims [ 3rd Div 11th Bde 43rd Btn D Coy Harry Ritchie MM Company CO ] Lieuts. T H Howden and C. L Herbert [all of the 43rd] and Lieut J Larkin (41st) were killed..... " )

pg17 of 49 The battalions of the 3rd Division did not differ from their sisters in following it more or less in one crowded line at the outset, the rear waves pressing upon the front ones in their haste to avoid the enemy’s barrage. The 43rd, which led the right brigade, met Germans at once. On the right a machine-gun
pg18 of 49
opened from a pillbox near Zonnebeke station; on the left some post threw bombs from the hilltop. All were quickly suppressed, the Germans on the crest fleeing. "

2017 AWM Bean Narrations by Jeff M. Weeks / Cowandilla Nominees Pty. Ltd. A.B.N. 64 008 081 838

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2008 - 2017 c Copyright Family War Histories Narrations by Jeff M. Weeks / Cowandilla Nominees Pty. Ltd. A.B.N. 64 008 081 838

1. Military Medal
* 1917Oct4 awarded MM during " advance on Zonnebeke " ( possibly from Polygon Wood / The Buttes Oct3, during which Battle [ Sep26 - Oct3 ] Plumer's II Anzac Corps [ Godley ] relieved Gough's V Corps [ Fanshawe ] on Sep28 ) ;
during the Battle of Broodseinde Cross Roads, 3rd Battle of Ypres ( 10 Military Medals & higher awards were awarded that same day to the 43rd Btn alone, mainly for engaging enemy machine guns &or pillboxes ) :-
43rd Battalion War Diary AWM 1917 Oct pg27 of 34
" During the advance N. of Zonnebeke on 4th Oct. 1917, when his platoon ( XV ) was held up by MG fire, he crawled forward & with his lewis Gun silenced the enemy MG and allowed the advance to continue "

October 4, 1917 - The blockhouse in the centre of the Tyne Cott cemetery ( World's largest Commonwealth Cemetery of WW1 ) was captured by the Australian 3rd Division ( incl 43rd Btn )

Fearing that the fine weather which had accompanied operations over the preceding fortnight might change, preparations for the attack were hurried forward. On the night before the scheduled start, rain began to fall; it was, however, decided to persist with the planned advance. At dawn on the 4th, 40 minutes before the scheduled start-time at 6 a.m., the 1st and 2nd Divisions were suddenly assailed by a mortar barrage which fell on the shell-holes where they were waiting. Although considerable casualties were suffered in this bombardment, the troops could only wait it out

( AWM Bean Vol4 Ch XX Third Step-Broodseinde Ridge [ Attack ]
pg12 of 49 " Some twenty officers are known to have been killed by the bombardment, and about a seventh of the attacking force of I Anzac appears to have been killed or wounded.
[ North of the railway outside the area of intense barrage Capt F G Sims ( 3rd Div 11th Bde 43rd Btn D Coy Harry Ritchie MM Company CO ) Lieuts. T H Howden and C. L Herbert (all of the 43rd) and Lieut J Larkin (41st) were killed. )

Australian Ligh Horse Study Centre

( ) = JMW notations + 2010 Dec Dept Veteran Affairs & Board Studies NSW + Charles Bean, Anzac to Amiens, Canberra, 1948, p.371
[ ] = Australian Light Horse Study Centre

The Battle of Broodseinde Ridge now commenced a few kilometres south of Passchendaele. The Australian 4th and 5th Divisions were replaced by the Australian 1st and 2nd Divisions which were also joined by the ( Monash's ) Australian 3rd Division ( incl 43rd Btn ) as well as a ( Russell's ) New Zealand division ( from right to left / from South to North ). It was the first time that 4 Anzac divisions had fought together. Twelve divisions would attack on a 12 kilometre front, the 4 Anzac Divisions Australian 1st, 2nd and 3rd ( incl 43rd Btn ) facing Broodseinde ridge and the New Zealand division facing Abraham heights

October 4, 1917 - The attack commenced at 6am after rain commenced falling the day before. Coincidentally, the Germans planned an attack for exactly the same time. At 5.20am the German artillery opened up and then at 6am the Australian artillery started, both in preparation for impending attacks. After both troops emerged from their trenches to commence attacking to their surprise they found the enemy doing exactly the same. The Australians managed to recover from the shock quicker than their opponents ( Germans [ 212th Regiment ] hesitated, alarmed as they found themselves confronted by a bigger attack than their own The Australians opened fire [ with their Lewis guns ] and the enemy broke, pursued by waves of attackers ) as the Australian machine gunners opened up and cut the German lines to pieces. The Germans broke and the Australians managed to capture the ridge. The New Zealanders also secured Abraham heights.

( Following the usual stiff fighting around ‘pillboxes’, the Australians gained all their objectives on the ridge – though at the cost of 6,500 casualties; the New Zealanders suffered a further 1,700 casualties. Along the whole line the attack had been successful, thereby giving the British forces their first glimpse of the [ Flemish ] lowlands beyond the top of the ridge since May 1915. Of Broodseinde Charles Bean, Australia’s official historian, wrote:

The day’s success was a very great one – indeed the most complete yet won by the British Army in France in that war. since beginning 1914 ! )

The triumph at Broodseinde presented the Allied High Command with an opportunity, perhaps in the upcoming spring, of breaking the German hold. The German tactic of immediate counter attacks had proved ineffective since the British never pushed beyond the range of their guns

Losses
In all the fighting in the 3rd Battle of Ypres, in and around Passchendaele the 3 Australian divisions lost 6,500 men which represented 20% of its operational strength. It is believed that the Germans lost 25,000 men and 5,000 prisoners. The German High Command officially recorded October 4, 1917 as a "Black Day". Fresh German troops were put in the line opposite the Anzac troops on October 5 despite Haig's attempts to break the German lines

Australian Battlefields www.ciaops.com now Digger History

2. 1st of 3 woundings Pill Box D/S ( converted to Allied 1st Aid Dressing Station ), at Ypres Salient retiring from Hill 40 - Windmill Cabaret
* 1917Oct4-17 prior ? Ypres Salient, shrapnel 1st wounding ;
as per Red Cross Notes & of eyewitness accounts for identification purposes of Mainland HO ; the dead &or missing in action 1917 Oct 17 ) :-
1918 Jun 12 Boulogne No7 Stat. Hosp. Inf. Pte S. O. Green 689, 43 ( Battalion ) D ( Coy ) XIII ( Platoon )
" Ritchie of D ( Coy ) XV ( Platoon ) told me that when they were coming out of Passchendaele, he saw Mainland killed by a shell splinter and he died at once. Ritchie was wounded by the same shell and recovered. ..... "

October 12, 1917 - The failed attack at dawn towards Passchendaele was made by the ( Monash's ) Australian 3rd ( incl 43rd Btn ) and ( Russell's ) New Zealand Divisions. The 4th Australian division of I Anzac supported the advance on the right while British Divisions supported it on the left. Heavy rain was continuing to fall and the New Zealand Division was halted by Germans firing from pillboxes who, without British artillery, were firing with impunity. The Australian 3rd Division ( incl 43rd Btn ) became bogged down in the mud of Ravebeek valley below Passchendaele,

( AWM Bean Vol4 Ch XXII Passchendaele II-October 12th [ Passchendaele II Attack ] :-
pg26 of 50 " The [ Plumer ] Second Army had thus practically returned to its starting point. So closely had the events of
October 9th been repeated that those who took part, reading an account of the last fight, might easily believe that their own action was being described. And this applies almost equally to the dreadful scenes that followed. In the morass of the Ravebeek valley the dead and wounded of the 3rd Division now lay mingled with those of the 66th. ( British )
It is true that the German snipers were not allowed to
pg27 of 50 reassume their former impudence; but during the fight they had sniped at least fifty men in the mud about Waterfields. [ pillbox ] Throughout October 13th stretcher-bearing parties struggled in the bog. " )

however a fragment of the division, 20 men mostly of the 38th Battalion, did reach the Passchendaele church at the edge of the town while some of the Australian 4th Division reached Keilberg. Both were forced to fall back being unsupported.

Losses
The Australian 3rd Division ( incl 43rd Btn ) suffered 3,199 casualties in the 24 hours of the battle, while the Australian 4th Division suffered 1,000. The New Zealand also suffered around 3,000 casualties in an action that achieved no valuable gains and only served to lift enemy spirits as they saw their attackers struggle

Australian Battlefields www.ciaops.com now Digger History

3. 2nd of 3 woundings " gsw " to Temple
* 1917Oct17 ? Ravebeek Valley, Passchendaele I ( Oct9 ) or II ( Oct12 ), 3rd Battle of Ypres ; "gsw" to temple 2nd wounding :

probably by snipers between October 9th Attack ( & ensuing days October 10th & 11th ) & October 12th Attack ( & ensuing days of October 13 th & 14th ) etc possibly at Waterfields pillbox or Augustus Wood ( see following AWM Bean ) :

AWM Bean Vol4 Ch XXII Passchendaele II-October 12th ( Attack )

( Oct9 Attack - Passchendaele I Bean )
pg6 of 50 " The 11th Australian Infantry Brigade, coming in on
October 10th to relieve the 66th Division, found that the units in the line were uncertain where their own front lay. An officer of the 42nd Battalion, Lieutenant Fisher, who, against the advice of several British officers, pressed on over Abraham Heights in daylight into the Ravebeek valley to ascertain the position before his troops arrived, came upon terrible scenes of which he has left a vivid description.
' The slope . . . . was littered with dead, both theirs and ours. I got to one pillbox to find it just a mass of dead, and so I passed on carefully to the one ahead. Here I found about fifty men alive, of the Manchesters. Never have I seen men so broken or demoralised. They
pg7 of 50 were huddled up close behind the box in the last stages of exhaustion and fear. Fritz had been sniping them off all day, and had accounted for fifty-seven that day-the dead and dying lay in piles. The wounded were numerous-unattended and weak, they groaned and moaned all over the place . . . some had been there four days already. . . . ( since Oct7 ? )
Finally the company came up-the men done after a fearful struggle through the mud and shell-holes, not to speak of the barrage which the Hun put down and which caught numbers. The position was obscure-a dark night-no line-demoralised Tommies-and no sign of the enemy. So I pushed out my platoon, ready for anything, and ran into the foe some 80 yards ahead. He put in a few bursts of rapid fire and then fled. We could not pursue as we had to establish the line, which was accomplished about an hour later. I spent the rest of the night in a shell-hole, up to my knees in mud and with the rain teeming down.
When
October 11th dawned, the German sniping from all parts of the front, including 'Augustus Wood,' which the British line was supposed to fringe, was impudent in the extreme. "

( Oct12 Attack - Passchendaele II Bean )
pg26 of 50 " The ( Plumer ) Second Army had thus practically returned to its starting point. So closely had the events of
October 9th been repeated that those who took part, reading an account of the last fight, might easily believe that their own action was being described. And this applies almost equally to the dreadful scenes that followed. In the morass of the Ravebeek valley the dead and wounded of the 3rd Division now lay mingled with those of the 66th. ( British )
It is true that the German snipers were not allowed to
pg27 of 50 reassume their former impudence; but during the fight they had sniped at least fifty men in the mud about Waterfields. ( pillbox ) Throughout October 13th stretcher-bearing parties struggled in the bog. "

October 18, 1917 - The Canadians were brought in to do in three stages ( 4 " step-by-step " Attacks ) what had been attempted by ( Godley's ) II Anzac in one ( 3 " step-by-step " Attacks : Oct 9, 12 & 26 ? ). Between October 26 and November 10, 1917 the Canadians finally captured Passchendaele Heights ( & Village ).
November, 1917 - the last Australian division had been withdrawn from Ypres.

The third battle of Ypres had comprised :-

eleven great Attacks ( 14+ ? ) including
Jul31 Warneton " diversion " ( preceded by the Jun22 - Jul9 " The 18 Days' Stunt " including The Windmill Feint [ Jun28 - Jul5 ] & " Raid " Jul3,
Jul31 Pilckem Ridge [ British & French ],
Aug10 Westhoek [ Allied & French ],
Aug15 Lens " diversion " ( Canadian & British )
Aug16 Langemarck [ British ] &
Oct 9 Poelcappelle ! [ Allied & French ] ) ;

five Battles ( 8+ ? ) including
Sep 20 Menin Road ( Allied ) &
Sep26 Polygon Wood ( Allied ),
Oct4 Broodseinde ( Allied ),
Oct9 Passchendaele Ridge I ( " diversion " ? ) ( Allied ),
Oct12 Passchendaele Ridge II )
ALL of which I or II Anzac had formed the spearhead, as did the Canadians for the final four ;

Oct26 Passchendaele ( III ? )( Allied / Canadian ) &
Oct30 Passchendaele ( III ? )( Canadian / Allied ? & British ),
Nov6 Passchendaele ( III ? ) Village ( Canadian success ) &
Nov10 Passchendaele ( III ? ) Village & heights ( Canadian & British ).

Losses
5 Australians Infantry Divisions had fought in the line for eight weeks and suffered a total of 38,093 casualties

Australian Battlefields www.ciaops.com now Digger History

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4. 3rd wounding " gsw " left Shoulder
* 1918Sept1-2 Scutari Trench ( near Haut Allaines, North of Somme ) after Mont St Quentin ; "gsw" left shoulder 3rd wounding ( only VC action of 43rd Btn )

August 8, 1918 - Marshal Foch wanted a double thrust with the British along the line of the Somme River for two main reasons, it was suitable for tanks and the Germans in the vicinity had been considerably weakened by Australian "peaceful penetration". The attack was to use 430 British tanks which would lead a three stage advance. To achieve maximum surprise there was no preliminary bombardment.

The "Battle of Amiens" commenced at 4.20am. The Australian 2nd and 3rd Divisions ( incl 43rd Btn ) had a front of about 3,600 metres. The Australian 4th and 5th stood ready to leapfrog the Australian 2nd and 3rd Divisions as the Battle commenced. With no prior bombardment the Germans were taken totally by surprise. By 7.30am the German lines were thoroughly broken that much of the field artillery had been overrun and captured. While the Australian 2nd and 3rd Divisions dug in to consolidate the ground they had won the Australian 4th and 5th Divisions leapfrogged them and at 8.20am began the second phase of the attack. In this new "open warfare" stage the Australians excelled, capturing Bayonvillers without a fight and by 11am the Australian 59th Battalion had captured Harbonniers. By the end of the day the Allies had punched a hole 20 kilometres wide and 11 kilometres deep in the German lines. The break through had driven them eastwards towards Perrone and Mont St Quentin. The Allied victory described as a "Black Day" for the German forces by German commanders

Losses
August 7 - 14 1918 - the 5 Australian Divisions suffered a total of 6,491 casualties, which represented 20% of their strength upon entering the battle

Awards
Lance Corporal Bernard Sidney Gordon, 41st Battalion, 11th Brigade, 3rd Division - Victoria Cross
August 2, 1918 - Temporary Corporal Lawrence Carthage Weathers, 43rd Battalion, 11th Brigade, 3rd Division - Victoria Cross

August 29, 1918 - German resistance begins to stiffen around Clery, 3 kilometres north west of Peronne
August 30, 1918 - Australian 3rd Division ( incl 43rd Btn ) commences attack of the "Battle of Mont St Quentin"

General Monash's objective was to render the line of the Somme River useless to the Germans as a defensive position and hasten their retreat to the Hindenburg Line. To achieve this called for an attack on the key position of the whole line of defence, on a hill called Mont St Quentin. Monash knew that his troops were under strength and badly in need of rest, but by now he considered them "invincible".

August 31, 1918 - The attack was on the key positions in the German line, a dominating hill known as Mont St Quentin, 1.5 kilometres from Peronne. The hill was less than 100 metres high but heavily guarded especially along the northern and westerly approaches. The Australian 5th Division objectives were the Peronne Bridges and Peronne, while the Australian 2nd Divisions was the bridgehead at Halle then Mont St Quentin and finally the Australian 3rd Division ( incl 43rd Btn ) was to capture the high ground north east of Clery, then Bouchavesnes spur. Facing the Australian Divisions at Mont St Quentin was the 2nd Prussian Guards, an elite German formation, who had orders to hold the hill "to the death".

The barrage commenced at 5am but much of the Australian's fighting reputation proceeded them with the enemy taking panic. The 5th Brigade of the Australian 2nd Division opened the attack, comprising only 70 officers and 1,250 other ranks it was less than one third of its normal strength. The 2nd Division battalions to assault Mont St Quentin were the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th all from NSW. The 17th battalion started along the Clery-Peronne road as the Germans retreated to more defensible ground. Within a short time they had captured, with only 550 men and 220 in support, what British generals consider "impregnable". However, the 5th Brigade could not hold all of its gains and part of the 2nd Prussian Guards Division drove back scattered troops from the summit of Mont St Quentin

On the left of the attack by the Australian 2nd Division, the Australian 3rd Division ( incl 43rd Btn ) attacking Bouchavesnes Spur had not successfully captured its objectives, this meant that earlier gains were threatened by German flanking moves. General Monash ordered that "Casualties no longer matter" and "We must get Bouchavesnes Spur and protect Rosenthal's left". The Spur was taken and the Mont St Quentin assault was protected.

September 1, 1918 - the 6th Australian Brigade, passing through the 5th Brigade seized in a second attempt the summit of Mont St Quentin while the Australian 14th Brigade ( 5th Division ) captured woods north of Peronne and took the main part of the town

September 2, 1918 - the Australian 7th Brigade ( 2nd Division ) drove beyond the Mont and the Australian 15th Brigade ( 5th Division ) seized the rest of Peronne

The result was that three weakened Australian Divisions were able to defeat five German Divisions. The action saw its fair share of heroics, with eight VC's awarded, and losses, with 20% of attacking forces becoming casualties. The battle was a true infantry victory achieved without the use of tanks or creeping artillery barrage.

Losses

Australian 2nd Division 84 Officers, 1,286 others
Australian 3rd Division 43 Officers, 544 others
Australian 5th Division 44 Officers, 1,026 others
Germans 3,500 casualties and 2,600 prisoners

Australian Battlefields www.ciaops.com now Digger History

1918Sep1 Pte 732 Harry Ritchie MM D Coy 43rd Btn 11th Bde 3rd Div AIF
3rd wounding "gsw" to left Shoulder
on successful Kassa Trench Attack &or later failed Scutari Trench Attack due to heavy MG fire casualties

1918Sep2 2nd attempt successful Scutari Trench Attack via Usler Trench,
only AFTER subdued German Prussian Guards MGs by 2nd Div when recaptured Mont St Quentin
( wrong tactically thought previous morning of 5.30am Sep1 to be already in Australian hands )

Due once again
( as with 1917Oct4 Broodseinde Ridge / Cross Roads )
to heavy D Coy casualties, their actions are covered in the C Coy Report, only
without a D Coy Report

Read more...

Harry Ritchie MM : Civilian , Post WW1 / William ( Father ), Harry &or 1 of 3 Daughters Shirley ( Weeks nee ) Ritchie Timeline/s :-

1916 Feb17 At time of his AIF Attestation :
Occupation : Trolley Driver for Murphy Fromen & Co Ltd, Blende & Beryl Streets, Broken Hill, NSW ; Distributors of Poultry, Fruits & Iced, Products ;
Residence: C/o Mother Sarah Ann Starr nee White ex Campbelltown, South Australia : 151 Oxide Street, Broken Hill, New South Wales
( later 163 Oxide Street, Broken Hill, New South Wales ; whilst giving Red Cross evidence of JE Curtis wounded &or Missing 1918 Sep 14 at the Cheltenham Racecourse Hospital : 3rd wounding left Shoulder “gsw” )

1911 Jun29 Protestant Hall Amusements : Future Wife, Freda Hocking, Dance Character : Victorian Lady
1918 Jul19 151 Oxide St, Broken Hill : 1917Oct4 MM award notification to Mother : Mrs SA Ritchie ( Sarah Ann Starr nee White )
1918 Sep14 163 Oxide St, Broken Hill, Home Address : Harry Ritchie MM Red Cross identification of MIA 1918 Jun1 3034 JE Curtis
1920 May5 Marriage 4th Son, Harry Ritchie to 2nd Daughter Freda Hocking, Broken Hill, New South Wales
1923 Nov3 Death Mother : Sarah Ann Starr nee White
1924 Jan8 Advertisement Father William Ritchie : Wanted girl about 18 for Fruit & Cool Drinks, 163 Oxide St, Broken Hill ;
1924 May2 Father William Ritchie, Fruiterer in business since 1890 : Oxide St Shop & Dwelling, construction
1926 Apr6 middle Daughter : Shirley aged 4 years Combined Methodist, Thomas Street, Sunday School Pinic, Little Athletics
1926 Jun25 Father William Ritchie 163 Oxide St, Broken Hill : To Let London Ham Shop & Dwelling
1927 Apr26 Barry Ritchie, 38 Wright St, Broken Hill ; platelayer, Zinc Corp, Broken Hill
1929 May28 Charles Ritchie : Shop & Office Fitters ;
1930 Feb18 Barry Ritchie, Back injuries ; platelayer, South Blocks, Broken Hill
1931 Jun19 - Nov30 North Girls School Class 4a eldest Daughter Beryl
1932 May10 North Girls School Class 4a middle Daughter Shirley
1931 - 1933 Change of Schools : Likely Father William Ritchie, lost his Businesses during largest Peak ( Trough ) of the Great Depression 1928 - 1939 ;
1932 Jul28 Cobera School Arbor Day : tiny tots race, Shirley Ritchie
1933 Apr25 Semaphore Yeo St : eldest Daughter Beryl 11, broke arm in School Yard Le Fevre Peninsula School
1933 Jul26 Cobera School Arbor Day : 4th Division & tiny tots races, Shirley Ritchie
1933 Semaphore : Shirley & Beryl with Cousins Maurice & Daphne ( Wilson ? )
1934 Dec22 Cobera School Annual Christmas Tree : Shirley Ritchie
1934 Cobera : Grasshoppers swarming District ; Harvesting in full swing, grain good & fairly heavy ; recent Storm, no rain, sheds unroofed & Haystacks blown off ;
1936 Oct27 Father William Ritchie late of 163 Oxide St now Lindstrom, chocolate coated ice cubes
1937 Sep28 Plane Passengers Australian National Airways : from Adelaide to Broken Hill, H Ritchie
1938 Sep18 Collector of Customs enquiry, Re Remembrance Day Tonic, brewed lager beer, Harry Ritchie of Franklin Street, Adelaide ( late ? Clayton Ave, Plympton )
1940 Sep6 Death Father : William Ritchie, 50 years in business, Broken Hill, NSW ; left 4 Sons : Messrs Charlie, George, Barry, Harry & 1 Daughter : Mrs L Boland ;
1945 Apr21 Damage to 167 Oxide St, Broken Hill by Boland Brothers : Shaw Fish Shop owned by Charles Ritchie ;
1952 Jul5 Mr & Mrs C Ritchie, Plympton formerly Broken Hill, son Robert engagement to Diana Kennedy ;
2012 Dec12 For Sale 1st time in 30 years : 163 - 165 Oxide St, Broken Hill ; Desert Flower Deli & 2 Br Dwelling

Bring alive past spirituality through History Research & relive past Lives

Many thanks & sincere regards
Jeff M. Weeks CPA, SA Fin Researcher Analyst

M: PREFERRED Contact SMS txt 7 days 04 2888 2844 as I am 75-80% deaf with a tone discrimination
A: Unit 3, 371 Morphett Road, Oaklands Park, SA 5046
T: Home Messages 101 : 08 8298 3787
E: contacts@travellersoz.com.au ( I get 300 + / Day but only check several times / Mth, by speed reading SUBJECT Headings only 1st,
because of my numerous [ other ] Projects incl
NAA AWM, ANZAC Tradition incl Family Histories WW1 & WW2 & Domesday Book ] Macro/Micro Economics, World Financial Markets, Currencies & Precious Metals, Research & Analyses )

All 4 WEEKS Brothers enlisted in WW1 : Francis James ( Jim ), Leslie Horace, Stanley William ( wounded 3 or 4 times Romani Beersheba etc with 3rd LHR ) & Roy Eric ;
As did All of Francis James Weeks 4 Sons enlisted WW2 : Stan, James ( Jim ), Max & Charlie
listed in order of seniority : from 1847 William Weeks & Mary Prideaux, Noarlunga, South Australia, Colonial Pioneer Farming Family to Francis Allen Prideaux Weeks & Elizabeth nee Northey

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Biography contributed by Jeff Weeks

732 Pte. Harry RITCHIE, 43rd Battalion, D Company, XV Platoon, Lewis Gun Section

Occupation: Trolley Driver for Murphy Fromen & Co Ltd, Blende & Beryl Streets, Broken Hill, NSW, Distributors of Poultry, Fruits & Iced, Products

Residence: 151 Oxide Street, Broken Hill, New South Wales (later 163 Oxide Street)

Born: 18 October 1893 at Broken Hill, New South Wales

Religion: Methodist

Son of: William Ritchie, Fruiterer, who was born in Angas Fillen, Scotland and Sarah Ann Starr, who was born near Adelaide

Marital Status: Single

Enlisted: 17 Feb 1916 at Morphettville Racecourse, South Australia - Camp Training Base Infantry D Coy, 7 Mar 1916

Embarked: 9 June 1916 per HMAT A19 Afric, Adelaide, South Australia

Returned: 14 May 1919 via HMAT Shropshire, Melbourne

Discharged: 28 Jun 1919

Served: Western Front of France and Belgium - participated in 10 of 11 attacks between 27 Mar 1917 and 01 Sep 1918 with the 43rd Battalion AIF, including;

04 Oct 1917: Advance on Zonnebeke/Broodseinde Ridge,

12 Oct 1917: 1st Passchedaele,

01 Sep 1918: Mont St Quentin - successful Kassa trench attack & failed Scutari trench attack; later successful via Usler trench ex Mont St Quentin

Medals: Military Medal, 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal

Death: 22 Mar 1973 at Adelaide, South Australia

Place of Burial: Enfield Memorial Park (Anglican section, Stevenson Garden, V)

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