George Harry OSWALD MC

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OSWALD, George Harry

Service Number: Officer
Enlisted: 18 October 1915, Adelaide, South Australia
Last Rank: Captain
Last Unit: 43rd Infantry Battalion
Born: Port Adelaide, South Australia, 22 January 1888
Home Town: Maylands, Norwood Payneham St Peters, South Australia
Schooling: Way College and Adelaide District High School
Occupation: Teacher
Died: Died of wounds, Peronne, France, 1 September 1918, aged 30 years
Cemetery: Daours Communal Cemetery Extension, France
Memorials: Adelaide National War Memorial, Australian War Memorial, Roll of Honour, Gladstone High School WW1 Roll of Honor, Peterborough Public School Honour Board WW1, University of Adelaide WW1 Honour Roll
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World War 1 Service

18 Oct 1915: Enlisted AIF WW1, Adelaide, South Australia
9 Jun 1916: Involvement AIF WW1, Lieutenant, 43rd Infantry Battalion, Enlistment/Embarkation WW1
9 Jun 1916: Embarked AIF WW1, Lieutenant, 43rd Infantry Battalion, HMAT Afric, Adelaide
1 Sep 1918: Involvement AIF WW1, Captain, SN Officer, 43rd Infantry Battalion, Mont St Quentin / Peronne

Captain George Harry Oswald

From François Berthout

Today I want to pay a solemn and respectful tribute to Captain George Harry Oswald who fought in the 43rd Australian Infantry Battalion. On the morning of September 1st 1918, during the Battle of Mont Saint Quentin which aims to take the city of Péronne he was wounded by a gunshot at his thigh and groin, he was evacuated to a first aid station but he died of his wounds in the same day at the age of 30 and the next day he was buried at the Daours Communal Cemetery Extension. Captain George Harry Oswald was awarded the Military Cross after an exeptional military service and for his acts of bravery on the battlefield.I would like to add a few words about the battle of Mont Saint Quentin during which he was wounded. This battle was planned by the Australian General John Monash who will say that the success of this attack is due to the courage, the bravery and the daring of his men and the British General Henry Rawlinson will describe the attack as "the greatest military feat of the war".
"Captain George Henry Oswald., who has been killed in action, when he enlisted on August 4, 1915, was in charge of the district High School, Peterborough, and was a captain in the senior cadets. He went into camp on September 1, 1915, with the rank of lieutenant. When the 43rd Battalion was organised he was one of the selected officers and sailed with this battalion on June 9, 1916. After a few months' service in France he was seconded for duty as chief bombing officer for the 11th Brigade. In October, 1917, he was given special divisional staff work in the battle for Passchendaele Ridge, and was awarded the Military Cross for excellent service on that occasion. He afterwards rejoined his battalion and was in the fighting zone until he was fatally wounded on September 1, 1918, on the third anniversary of his commencing service in South Australia. He leaves a widow and one daughter, 4 years of age. Lieutenant-Colonel Butler, formerly commanding officer of the 43rd, in a letter to Mrs. Oswald, says:
"Your husband was one of the best and bravest officers in the battalion. His work at the battles of Messines. Warneton, and Passchendaele was most highly commended by the divisional and brigade commanders. By his courage and devotion to duty he set a magnificent example to all who had the privilege of serving with him. His loss will be most keenly felt by all ranks hi the battalion, and the very deep sympathy of all his comrades will go out to you and all his dear ones.''

We will never forget you 🌺🇦🇺🌺

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Biography

"Captain G. H. OSWALD, M.C., who has been killed in action, when he enlisted on August 4, 1915, was in charge of the district High School, Peterborough, and was a captain in the senior cadets. He went into camp on September 1, 1915, with the rank of lieutenant. When the 43rd Battalion was organised he was one of the selected officers and sailed with this battalion on June 9, 1916. After a few months' service in France he was seconded for duty as chief bombing officer for the 11th Brigade. In October, 1917, he was given special divisional staff work in the battle for Passchendaele Ridge, and was awarded the Military Cross for excellent service on that occasion. He afterwards rejoined his battalion and was in the fighting zone until he was fatally wounded on September 1, 1918, on the third anniversary of his commencing service in South Australia. He leaves a widow and one daughter, 4 years of age. Lieutenant-Colonel Butler, formerly commanding officer of the 43rd, in a letter to Mrs. Oswald, says:-

"Your husband was one of the best and bravest officers in the battalion. His work at the battles of Messines. Warneton, and Passchendaele was most highly commended by the divisional and brigade commanders. By his courage and devotion to duty he set a magnificent example to all who had the privilege of serving with him. His loss will be most keenly felt by all ranks hi the battalion, and the very deep sympathy of all his comrades will go out to you and all his dear ones.'' - from the Adelaide Advertiser 17 Sep 1918 (nla.gov.au)

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