Frederick Rowland BOUGHEN MM

Badge Number: S7825, Sub Branch: St Peters
S7825

BOUGHEN, Frederick Rowland

Service Numbers: 2372, 2372A
Enlisted: Not yet discovered
Last Rank: Sergeant
Last Unit: 27th Infantry Battalion
Born: Mundoora , South Australia, 12 April 1891
Home Town: Mundoora, Barunga West, South Australia
Schooling: Not yet discovered
Occupation: Blacksmith
Died: 6 December 1994, aged 103 years, cause of death not yet discovered, place of death not yet discovered
Cemetery: Enfield Memorial Park, S.A.
Memorials: Mundoora War Memorial, Port Broughton War Memorial
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World War 1 Service

21 Sep 1916: Involvement Private, SN 2372, 50th Infantry Battalion
21 Sep 1916: Embarked Private, SN 2372, 50th Infantry Battalion, HMAT Commonwealth, Adelaide
11 Nov 1918: Involvement Sergeant, SN 2372, 27th Infantry Battalion
20 Aug 1919: Honoured Military Medal, On July 8th at Villers Bretonneux Corporal Boughen lead an attack on the enemy trenches and by his pluck and example was instrumental in the success of the operation. 1,800 yards of trench, 17 prisoners and 2 machine guns were captured in this position. During this attack which was carried out in daylight, Corporal Boughen single handed rushed a post which was offering resistance, killing two and capturing three of the enemy. He has served almost continuously with his Battalion, and has rendered invalueable service. During the advance east of Amiens from August 8th to October 3rd 1918, his great courage and initiative were large factores nwhich made for the success of the operations.
Date unknown: Wounded SN 2372A, 27th Infantry Battalion

WW1

The details provided are taken from the book "Stealth Raiders - a few daring men in 1918" written by Lucas Jordan, published 2017 - refer to pages 125 to 129 and page 262. Prior to the war he was a blacksmith of Koolunga SA. He enlisted 26 Jan 1916 aged 24 years. He served with the 27th Infantry Battalion and was awarded a Military Medal for his service. He was promoted to the rank of Sergeant during the war. He departed the UK for home 12 June 1919.

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Biography contributed by tony griffin

Frederick Boughen was the son of George and Louisa Mary Boughen of Mundoora where George was the lesee of the Mundoora Hotel.  He was born at Mundoora in 1892. When Frederick was five his father committed suicide and his mother then remarried to William Pengilly. In 1916 Frederick, a blacksmith, married Frances Nora Meaney and settled her at Mundoora before enlisting on 26 January 1916. Frederick was 24 years old. 

Frederick was appointed to 5th Reinforcements 50 Battalion and embarked from Adelaide aboard HMAT A73 “Commonwealth” on 21 September 1916 and disembarked at Plymouth on 14 November. On 28 December he proceeded overseas to France where he was taken on strength of 27 Battalion. On 4 October 1917 Frederick was wounded in action when he received a severe gunshot wound to his left arm. On this day 27 Battalion was fighting in the Ypres area in Belgium.

The battalion diary for that day reads:

Battalion was in first position of assembly at 5am. At Zero hour Battalion moved forward to a position on Anzac Ridge. At zero hour + 70 minutes the Battalion moved forward to a position on rear of first objective and dug in. At 8.10am A & B Coys moved forward to assist 26 Battalion in taking 2nd objective. Objective gained and position consolidated.

Frederick was evacuated to hospital in England on 30 October and returned to France on 22 January 2018 where he rejoined 27 Battalion. On 22 May Frederick was wounded for second time with a shrapnel wound to his left arm. On this day the battalion was in action in the Albert area.

The battalion diary for that day reads:

The swamp south of the ANCRE was reconnoitred and some wire put out to temporarily close it to enemy movement. D Coy reserve moved from Railway Embankment to Emu Support Trench on higher ground. 2 patrols were sent out, 1 from each front line Coy and moved freely through “No Man’s Land” without encountering the enemy. Carrying parties, for meals, carried all night from cookers near Ribemont to forward areas.

Frederick returned to the battalion in June and was promoted to Lance Corporal two weeks later. In September he was again promoted to Corporal and in April 1919 to Temporary Sergeant

Frederick was recommended for a Military Medal for his bravery in the Villers-Bretonneux area.

His citation reads:

Corporal BOUGHEN has rendered conspicuous service over a lengthy period.

On July 8th 1918 at VILLERS BRETONNEUX, this N.C.O. lead an attack on the enemy trenches, and by his pluck and example was instrumental in the success of the operation. 1,800 yards of trench, 17 prisoners and 2 machine guns were captured in this position. During this attack which was carried out in daylight, Corporal BOUGHEN single handed rushed a post which was offering resistance, killing two and capturing three of the enemy. He has served almost continuously with his Battalion, and has rendered invaluable service. During the advance East of Amiens from August to October 3rd 1918, his great courage and initiative were large factors which made for the success of the operations.

Frederick embarked for Australia aboard HT “Port Darwin” on 12 June 1919 and disembarked in Adelaide on 2 July 1919. He was discharged on 12 September 1919.

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Biography contributed by Kathleen Bambridge

General Birdwood presented him with his Military Medal 6 March 1920.