Dr. Douglas Lewis BARLOW MC

BARLOW, Douglas Lewis

Service Numbers: Officer, Commissioned, S100005
Enlisted: 12 March 1941, Wayville, SA
Last Rank: Lieutenant Colonel
Last Unit: 10th Infantry Battalion
Born: Gawler, South Australia, 18 June 1894
Home Town: Prospect, Prospect, South Australia
Schooling: Gawler, Prince Alfred College, Adelaide University, South Australia
Occupation: Medical Practitioner
Died: Payneham, South Australia, 4 December 1950, aged 56 years, cause of death not yet discovered
Cemetery: Centennial Park Cemetery, South Australia
General AB
Memorials: Adelaide University of Adelaide WW1 Honour Roll, Prospect Roll of Honour A-G WWI Board
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World War 1 Service

19 Oct 1915: Involvement AIF WW1, Captain, SN Officer, Hospital Transport Corps
27 May 1916: Embarked AIF WW1, Captain, Hospital Transport Corps, HMAT Karoola, Melbourne
12 Oct 1916: Transferred AIF WW1, Captain, 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital
20 Nov 1916: Transferred AIF WW1, Captain, 7th Infantry Battalion
23 Nov 1917: Honoured Military Cross, 'For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.During the operations east of YPRES on 4th October 1917, Captain BARLOW advanced with his battalion, lay under a heavy enemy barrage before the attack, and then went forward and established a R.A.P. in the neighbourhood of REMUS WOOD. In spite of constant enemy shelling Captain BARLOW went about dressing wounded men and assisting in their removal to a place of shelter. Owing to the casualties among the bearers he was cut off from the Ambulance clearing his post, for several hours and it was mainly owing to his courage and devotion that the wounded received attention and shelter dutign this period. He set a splendid example to all bearers and showed great resource in dealing with a particularly difficult situation.'

Major General
Commanding 1st Australian Division
2 Sep 1918: Wounded AIF WW1, Captain, SN Commissioned, 7th Infantry Battalion, Mild gassing
  • 2nd September 1918 - admitted to No 37 Casualty Clearing Station
  • 3rd September 1918 - transferred to Ambulance Train 11
  • 4th September 1918 - transferred to No 32 Stationary Hospital Wimereux
  • 9th September 1918 - discharged for duty
  • 15 Sep 1918: Transferred AIF WW1, Captain, 2nd Australian General Hospital: AIF
    28 Sep 1918: Transferred AIF WW1, Captain, 10th Infantry Battalion

    World War 2 Service

    12 Mar 1941: Enlisted Wayville, SA
    12 Mar 1941: Involvement Lieutenant Colonel, SN S100005

    World War 1 Service

    Date unknown: Wounded

    Awarded Military Cross

    'For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He advanced with the battalion, established his aid post, and dressed the wounded and assisted in their removal under constant shelling. Owing to casualties among bearers he was cut off from the ambulance clearing post for several hours, and it was mainly owing to his exertions that the wounded received attention and shelter during this period.'
    Returned to Australia 26 February 1919 per 'Demosthenes'

    "Blood, Sweat and Fears"

    Full story of life contained in

    “Blood, Sweat and Fears”
    ISBN: 978-0-64692-750-3
    Medical Practitioners and Medical Students of South Australia
    who served in WW1

    Showing 2 of 2 stories

    Biography

    Excerpt from Blood Sweat and Fears: Medical Practitioners and Medical Students of South Australian who Served in World War 1. Courtesy of the Authors

     

    Douglas Lewis Barlow, the second son of Arthur William Barlow, retailer, was born in Gawler on the 18th June 1894.  He was educated locally and then at Prince Alfred College. He had a brilliant scholastic career and was dux of the school in 1910, winning the Elder and Longbottom scholarships and top place in the State higher public school examination. He studied medicine at the University of Adelaide and graduated with first class honours in 1915. He was a house surgeon at the Adelaide Hospital and had 3 years’ experience with the Senior Cadet Militia and 2 years as a private in the 31st AMC. He lived next door to the Bollens at 9 Fitzroy Terrace, Prospect, SA.

    Barlow enlisted in the AIF on 19th October 1915 and applied for a commission in the AMC. On enlistment he was 21 years old, 5ft 9ins tall, weighed 10st 7lbs.  His father, of Fitzroy Terrace, was named as his next of kin. Barlow embarked for England in the Karoola from Melbourne on 27th May 1916 and was transferred to the 1 AAH, Harefield, England; then to the 2nd Field Amb and within a month to the 7th Australian Inf Battalion in France. He was awarded the Military Cross on 26th November 1917 at Ypres, ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack.  He advanced with the battalion, established his aid post, and dressed the wounded and assisted in their removal under constant shelling. Owing to casualties among bearers he was cut off from the ambulance clearing post for several hours, and it was mainly owing to his exertions that the wounded received attention and shelter during this period.’ After leave breaks in England and Paris, he was gassed by the enemy on 4th September 1918. It was a mild exposure but he was managed via the AAMC evacuation through CCS, No 32 Stationary Hospital and the 2 AGH.   He was discharged to duty to the Australian Division 10th Bn on 15th September 1918. There he was considered fit to travel and embarked to Australia in Demosthenes arriving at the 4 MD, Adelaide on 28th February 1919.  A Medical Board in March found him not fit for General Duties for another 6 months due to his history of being gassed, asthma, weight loss and general debility. His Service was terminated on 8th April 1919. He was issued with the British War Medal and the Victory Medal

    After the War he continued to serve in the citizen forces. He was awarded the Efficiency Decoration and promoted to lieutenant-colonel in 1935. During the Second World War he was a consultant to the Army with the rank of Colonel.   He received his MD in 1922 for his thesis on Asthma, Hay Fever and Allied Conditions.  He held several honorary positions as a pathologist and bacteriologist at the Adelaide Children's Hospital, Adelaide Hospital and Adelaide University. He was active in medical politics especially regarding allergy and vaccines. During WW2 he started the first private pathology service in SA which, after his untimely death in 1950, Dr Eugene McLachlan continued. Douglas Lewis Barlow died on the 4th December 1950 at the time he lived and practiced on Portrush Road. He was survived by wife Mora and their three children; a daughter and a son who became doctors, and a son who became an engineer.

     

    Sources:
    http://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/NameSearch/Interface/ItemDetail.aspx?Barcode=3049568.

    MJA, 1.1951.; Photo: AWM E01814

    Commonwealth Gazette no 137, August 1918

     

     

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    Biography contributed by Annette Summers

    After WW1 Barlow continued to serve in the CMF as a captain in the AAMC. Promoted major in 1931 and he was posted as OC of 8Fd Hygiene section until 1934. He was awarded the Efficiency Decoration and promoted to lieutenant-colonel in 1935 when he became CO of 6 Cav FdAmb.  He re-enlisted on 12th March 1941 was posted as CO 108 Convalescent Depot at Annaburroo, Northern Territory until September 1941. He continued during the war as a consultant to the Army with the rank of Colonel.  

    Source

    Blood, Sweat and Fears III: Medical Practitioners South Australia, who Served in World War 2. 

    Swain, Jelly, Verco, Summers. Open Books Howden, Adelaide 2019. 

    Uploaded by Annette Summers AO RFD

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