Duncan CHAPMAN

Poppy

CHAPMAN, Duncan

Service Number: Officer
Enlisted: 21 August 1914, Brisbane, Queensland
Last Rank: Major
Last Unit: 45th Infantry Battalion
Born: Maryborough, Queensland, 15 May 1888
Home Town: Maryborough, Fraser Coast, Queensland
Schooling: Central Primary School and Maryborough Boys Grammar
Occupation: Paymaster
Died: Killed in Action, France, 6 August 1916, aged 28 years
Cemetery: Pozières British Cemetery
Memorials: Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour, Bundaberg War Memorial, Duncan Chapman Memorial, Maryborough Queen's Park War Memorial, Maryborough State High School Roll of Honour
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World War 1 Service

21 Aug 1914: Enlisted AIF WW1, Lieutenant, Brisbane, Queensland
24 Sep 1914: Involvement AIF WW1, Lieutenant, 9th Infantry Battalion, Enlistment/Embarkation WW1
24 Sep 1914: Embarked AIF WW1, Lieutenant, 9th Infantry Battalion, HMAT Omrah, Brisbane
25 Apr 1915: Involvement AIF WW1, Lieutenant, SN Officer, 9th Infantry Battalion, 'ANZAC' / Gallipoli
26 Apr 1915: Promoted AIF WW1, Captain, 9th Infantry Battalion
14 Mar 1916: Transferred AIF WW1, Major, 45th Infantry Battalion
6 Aug 1916: Involvement AIF WW1, Major, 45th Infantry Battalion, Battle for Pozières

Letter from the First Man to Land on Gallipoli

LETTER FROM MR. DUNCAN CHAPMAN.
FIRST MAN, TO LAND ON GALLIPOLI.
Mr. C. F. Chapman, of Messrs. Finney Isles. & Co., Maryborough, has received the following interesting letter from his brother, Mr. Duncan Chapman, from Gallipoli : No doubt you have read and re-read the various accounts of our landing here, and a good many of them have given the facts pretty accurately. To me was given the extreme honour of being actually the first man to put foot ashore on the
peninsula, and to lead a portion of the men up the hill in that now historic charge. What a living Hell 'it was, too, and how I managed to go through it from 4 o'clock in the morning of Sunday, April ; 25, to Wednesday, the 28th, under fire the
whole time, without being hit, is a mystery to me. We have firmly established ourselves now, and although the Unspeakable has made various attempts to dislodge us, and, threatened to push us into the sea. his efforts have been abortive. He has come to respect the fighting qualities of the Australian, and is
now resorting to defensive measures, which, performed under the guidance of German officers, are done pretty thoroughly. I was put in charge of a full company of about 263 men.
The responsibility is certainly great, especially as the lives of these men are practically given into one's keeping. It is nine weeks since we landed here, and many poor fellows tasted of the horrors of the campaign Many noble acts have been performed, and courage is a quality that is not wanting among our fellows.
In the Turk we have a truly obstinate fighter, and he has well earned the title of the 'Fighting Turk.' The heat here at the present time is unbearable, and the flies are so numerous that it is doubtful who gets the most when uncover our tucker
and make an attempt to eat it. Washing in fresh water is a thing of the past, and our change of clothing and shaving mornings are few and far between. The first list that was compiled here I was put down as missing, also posted in Cairo as
having gone astray, but luckily they were wrong, as the fact of being taken by the enemy on the first day held out no hope for the poor unfortunate chaps who had this misfortune. Young Harvey, from Maryborough, was wounded the first day,
and has not returned so far, and his father is away. on sick leave. Our battalion, the 9th, which formed the covering party, lost heavily, especially among the officers, who were spotted mostly by the snipers. The close shaves I had were remarkable, and if I am spared to get back, I have a few curios of interest to
show. Well, old man, 'the mail is closing shortly, arid I have to censor a couple of hundred letters so will have to close.

Daily Mercury Thursday 26 August 1915 Page 7

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The Death of Major Duncan Chapman reported to locals

DEATH OE MAJOR DUNCAN K.
CHAPMAN.
The sad news was received in town yesterday that Major Duncan K. Chapman had been killed in action in France. The deceased officer was well known in Maryborough. He received his elementary education at the Central Boys State School, from which he entered the Grammar School at the beginning of 1903, gaining a Trustees Entrance scholarship. Here he took a prominent part in Sport,
more particularly on the football field, and was a fairly able gymnast. He subsequently was employed at the office of Messrs. Morton, Gordon and Morton, solicitors, for some time. He afterwards left Maryborough and at the outbreak of war he enlisted with the 9th Battalion and took part in the famous landing at Gallipoli on the historic morning of April 25th, 1915. It was generally admitted that the late Major Chapman was one of the first, if not the very first man, to land
On that occasion. Promotion came fairly quickly, and while at the front he was successively raised to the rank of Captain and Major. The late Major Chapman was a brother of Mr.C. T. Chapman of Messrs. Finney, Isles & Coy, Maryborough. Two other brothers are also on active service, the younger, Sydney, holding the rank of lieutenant.

Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser Friday 25 August 1916 page 3

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The Homecoming that never was

Captain L Pickup, Commanding Officer of the 45th Battalion stated on August 6, 1916.

Major Chapman was killed by shell-fire almost as soon as he reached the front line at Pozieres on 6.8.1916. He was very much knocked about and owing to the extreme difficulties of the situation at the time it is not known if there was any burial. A cross was erected however some days later at approximately 400 yards east of Pozieres.

"Fraser Coast Herald" 27.04.17, page 23.

Biography contributed by Faithe Jones

DEATH OE MAJOR DUNCAN K.
CHAPMAN.
The sad news was received in town yesterday that Major Duncan K. Chapman had been killed in action in France. The deceased officer was well known in Maryborough. He received his elementary education at the Central Boys State School, from which he entered the Grammar School at the begining of 1903, gaining a Trustees Entrance scholarship. Here he took a prominent part in Sport, more particularly on the football field, and was a fairly able gymnast. He subsequently was employed at the office of Messrs. Morton, Gordon and Morton, solicitors, for some time. He afterwards left Maryborough and at the outbreak of war he enlisted with the 9th Battalion and took part in the famous landing at Gallipoli on the  historic morning of April 25th, 1915.  It was generally admitted that the late Major Chapman was one of the first, if not the very first man, to land On that occasion. Promotion came fairly quickly, and while at the front he was successively raised to the rank of Captain and Major. The late Major Chapman was a brother of Mr.C. T. Chapman of Messrs. Finney, Isles & Coy, Maryborough. Two other brothers are also on active service, the younger, Sydney, holding the rank of lieutenant.

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