Peter RIDDELL

RIDDELL, Peter

Service Numbers: 19, 43, 1548, 1548A
Enlisted: 1 October 1899, "A" Battery, Royal Australian Artillery (Qld.), Brisbane, Queensland
Last Rank: Private
Last Unit: 4th Pioneer Battalion
Born: Glasglow, Scotland, 1 January 1875
Home Town: Williamstown, Hobsons Bay, Victoria
Schooling: Not yet discovered
Occupation: Fireman
Died: Natural causes, Parkville, Victoria, 1 January 1949, aged 74 years
Cemetery: Not yet discovered
Memorials:
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Boer War Service

1 Oct 1899: Involvement Australian and Colonial Military Forces (Boer War / Boxer Rebellion), Gunner, SN 19, 1st Queensland Mounted Infantry
1 Oct 1899: Enlisted Australian and Colonial Military Forces (Boer War / Boxer Rebellion), Gunner, SN 19, 1st Queensland Mounted Infantry, "A" Battery, Royal Australian Artillery (Qld.), Brisbane, Queensland
2 Oct 1899: Involvement Australian and Colonial Military Forces (Boer War / Boxer Rebellion), Gunner, SN 19, 1st Queensland Mounted Infantry
1 Nov 1899: Embarked Australian and Colonial Military Forces (Boer War / Boxer Rebellion), Gunner, SN 19, 1st Queensland Mounted Infantry, Machine Gun Section, s.s. Cornwall, Pinkenba (Brisbane)
23 Jan 1901: Discharged Australian and Colonial Military Forces (Boer War / Boxer Rebellion), Gunner, SN 19, 1st Queensland Mounted Infantry, Disembarked at Sydney on steamer Persic after being invalided home due to maitland fever and rheumatism, arrived in Brisbane on 18 August 1900
11 Apr 1901: Enlisted Australian and Colonial Military Forces (Boer War / Boxer Rebellion), Private, SN 43, Bushveldt Carbineers (BVC), Pretoria, South Africa
16 Oct 1901: Discharged Australian and Colonial Military Forces (Boer War / Boxer Rebellion), Private, SN 43, Bushveldt Carbineers (BVC)

World War 1 Service

3 Mar 1916: Enlisted AIF WW1, Private, SN 1548, Melbourne, Victoria
6 Jun 1916: Involvement AIF WW1, Private, SN 1548, 3rd Pioneer Battalion, Enlistment/Embarkation WW1
6 Jun 1916: Embarked AIF WW1, Private, SN 1548, 3rd Pioneer Battalion, HMAT Wandilla, Melbourne
22 Jul 1916: Promoted AIF WW1, Lance Sergeant, 3rd Pioneer Battalion
19 Nov 1916: Transferred AIF WW1, Private, 4th Pioneer Battalion, Reverted to Private
21 Jul 1917: Discharged AIF WW1, Private, SN 1548A, 4th Pioneer Battalion, For home service, medically unfit

Help us honour Peter Riddell's service by contributing information, stories, and images so that they can be preserved for future generations.

Biography contributed by Paul Trevor

'Machine Gun Section of "A" Battery, Royal Australian Artillery (Qld.), seconded to 1st Queensland Mounted Infantry.

The Machine Gun Section was taken from the Royal Australian Artillery (Queensland). The contingent arrived in Cape Town on 12 December 1899. Owing to the weight of the machine gun carriage and the condition the horses were in, it was found that even with four horses per gun they could not keep up with the Column, and were, therefore, worse than useless. The machine guns were therefore handed over complete with harness and all spare parts to Colonel Chambier, Royal Artillery, at Kimberley, and, being required for further service, were retained when the Contingent returned to Queensland.' from Official Records of the Australian Military Contingents to the War in South Africa. Page 448 (archive.org)

'Local and General News.

The second large batch of invalided Queensland soldiers from South Africa to the number of 42 passed through Toowoomba by the Sydney mail train on Saturday evening en route to Brisbane. They had a very hearty reception during their brief stay here. The local military forces turned out In strength to greet them, and as the train, which was nearly an hour late, steamed in, the Mounted Infantry Band, under Mr. Haskew, struck up "Home Sweet Home." The platform was densely packed with enthusiastic spectators. The Mayor, on behalf of the Toowoomba citizens, tendered a hearty welcome to the men, which was emphasised by Alderman Trapp in a few appropriate remarks.

Sergeant-Major Price returned thanks on behalf of the men, who were loudly cheered, and the train moved out amid the strains of "Auld Lang Syne." The following is a list of the names of the forty-two men who returned :- Sergeant-major J. G. Prlce, Sergeant H. F. Walker, Corporals A. Kidd (Toowoomba), D. Harris, A. Wagner (Toowoomba), Privates R. T. Thomas, J. McDonald, J. E. N. Bull, N. de Verdon, R. McKenzie, W. Rossiter, J. H. Hitchcock, W. Commack, G. Izlaub (Toowoomba), R. S. Pitt, E. V. Fieldlng, R. Smith, S. Washbourne, J. Banks, G. W. T. Waterton, R. Greenwell, W. J. Evans, W. H. Stewart, J. Grayson, J. Ross, J. Cathcart, T. R. Maxwell, J. Locke, M. Egan, H. McNeven, G. Michael, D. McIntosh, P. J. Kavanagh, J. J. Dodson, J. Connolly, W. A. McLeish (Toowoomba), H. G. Fordham, A. W. Dodd, W. Brady, T. Cobon, W. H. Phillips, Gunner P. Riddell. Gunner H. Mungall could not be brought on through illness, and was left behind in the South. Most of the invalids
are from the First Contingent, and a few were members of the Second Contingent. One left with the Fourth Contingent, but had to return on landing owing to ill-health.' from Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser 21 Aug 1900 (nla.gov.au)

'INVALIDS REJOINING.

The undermentioned invalids, being no longer required for the special service for which they were enrolled, will rejoin the Queensland Regiment of Royal Australian Artillery: First Contingent— Sergeant F. Price, Corporal D. Harris, Gunners J. Smith, P. Riddell, and H. Mungall. Second Contingent— Corporal J. Connolly and Corporal T. Halligan.' from The Week 21 Sep 1900 (nla.gov.au)

'Bush Veldt Carbineers.

The Bush Veldt Carbineers were raised in Pretoria in February 1901 and did useful work in the difficult country north of Pietersburg in that year. They saw a lot of fighting, but it gained an unfortunate notoriety by the conviction of Morant, Handcock and Witton on charges that they had committed acts not in accordance with the rules of civilised warfare.

Undoubtedly a corps such as this, acting beyond the immediate control of higher authorities and far from support, was placed in a very unenviable position. The enemies they had to deal with were not always members of regular commandos, but often leaderless gangs of ruffians not unacquainted with nefarious practices and incapable of appreciating anything but the most arbitrary justice. Mr Green, who was chaplain to the Australian Bushmen, a corps that operated much in the Pietersburg district, speaks in terms of praise of the Bush Veldt Carbineers. He says that they were chiefly English refugees of that district. They acted as scouts for General Plumer, and did well. On one occasion they captured the convoy of a train-wrecking gang and 11 prisoners. These latter would not disclose where their mines were laid, so they were promptly put on a trolley; an explosion did take place, but none were killed.

The Bush Veldt Carbineers were renamed to the Pietersburg Light Horse on 1 December 1901. The unit was employed in the extreme north of the Transvaal — officially designated as 'the wildest part' of that country.' LINK (www.angloboerwar.com)

 

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